Question on laying worker hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jul 13, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I have a fairly larg hive that I am pretty sure has developed a laying worker. I have put in a queen cell, put in a virgin queen(before they became a laying worker) but still no sign of a queen. Scattered drone brood is all I can find. Its 2 deeps with 2 supers on it.

    I'm tired of dealing with this hive.

    My question. Can I just take a couple frames and add them in to other smaller hives and break it up? Maybe help the smaller hives a bit? What happens if I put the
    laying worker in a hive that has a real queen?

    Not sure the best way to deal with it, but I am not going to try and save it. I have 2 nuc's with good laying queens that need to be moved to full deeps and I am going to us some of the drawn deep frames to get them going quicker.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have had success combining a strong nuc on top with the newspaper method and came out with a strong hive,it's just one of those things that can go either way. As i have stated before, i don't waste my time with drone laying hives.I take them 100ft. away, shake them all out, remove everything where there hive was and let them find one of my other hives to go to. JMHO Jack
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I do the same as Jack. You can spend many frames of eggs one one and still have a laying worker hive. Introducing a queen is about a 50/50 chance also.

    Shaking the bees out will break everything up and hopefully do away the laying workers.

    I have one that I am going to play around with, it is packed solid with drones. Not sure what happened to the queen they were building up so nicely too.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I do the same as above, but easier. I shake them on the ground 5 feet in front of the hive, then take the hive to the house.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I kind of do as Iddee describes in knocking the bees off the frame and then add these typically to a small nuc for the added feed value.

    having said that I would also suggest you may need to wait just a little while longer if you have not see many many multiple eggs in the bottom of a cells (sure sign of a laying worker)... I suggest this due to this snippet...

    'Scattered drone brood is all I can find.'

    and will tell you that the time line in the development of a new queen that her first egg laying will somewhat correspond to the very last drones emerging. if you have difficulty seeing eggs then simply add another 5 days or so and then the evidence of the queens presence via the larvae and the larvae food should be quite easy to notice.
     
  6. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I'm dumping them tomorrow. I;ve been messing around with them long enough. First tried a queen cell. That didn't work. Then I put in a virgin queen and they released her. That didn't work either. Still queen less. I just a huge queen hatch today. Looks like she is a year old already. I am not going to chance her with this hive.

    I also have 2 strong nucs that I need to hive, so, going to dump them and use their 2 deep boxes and comb to get the strong nucs going.

    I gave it "the ole college try" with this hive.

    Has a queen ever been to big to take a mating flight? This one is huge. The queen cell was very long. Have high hopes for her. She is from one of my best hives.
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Place one of the nucs were the hive is with the bees transferred in a standard super and the bees will come back to the hive location. shake the first 5 frames and add them to the bottom super. shake the next 10 and place the empty super on top. shake the remaining frames and give these frames to the second nuc. Rake any drone in worker cells that are caped and the bees will remove the larva so the cells can be laid in by the queen now and not have to wait for the drone brood to emerge. if there are a lot of laid in cells you could scratch again in a week to 9 days.
     
  8. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I had a laying worker hive. I took a nuc in my apiary that needed a boost and placed it where the laying worker hive was then shook all the bees from the laying worker hive onto the ground about 100 ft from the hive as the sun was setting. I gave all the frames to the nuc by stacking 2 more deep nuc boxes on top. A week later I have a pretty strong nuc.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    useful thread. I started with an unmated queen that failed and became laying worker, put a nuc on top with a mated queen and 2 nuc boxes of comb and bees and somehow ended up laying worker. I am attempting to requeen. Again
     
  10. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    You probably won't have success with requeening. I had 2 like that. I just put a sheet of newspaper on a hive and plopped the laying worker hive on top. Both turned out to be very strong hives.
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    If you do requeen? kill the unmated queen before before introducing the new queen if you haven't? Jack
     
  12. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    If the hive has laying workers it won't have a queen in it.
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I think I managed to lose MOST of the laying workers in the first dumpout 6 weeks ago. They started making queen cells, of course only drone brood in them but MUCH less brood. Dumped farther away, and twice. this time, and moved the hive, then eventually ended up putting one box of it back there. Queen is in a laying cage tonight, will make bigger laying cage, like half a frame size, and move her into it tomorrow. 2nd queen I bought is in a nuc in a different location, I grabbed 2 frames from my big hive but only got about half a cup of bees, nurse bees and wax workers, but they are working on getting her out. Newspapered the other box of laying worker hive on top. will check for eggs tomorrow, both nucs have extrememly small entrances and I am at home to address robbing issues. the 2nd nuc, with the half a cup of nurse bees, has a very good robber screen on it.