Question on queen cells

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by G3farms, Jun 15, 2010.

  1. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I had pulled a frame of bees (no queen), honey, pollen, capped brood and it also had just a few freshly laid eggs and put into an observation hive for a friend that is doing a vacation bible school theme that is some how related. Anyway they got to missing their queen and pulled two emergency queen cells. I have been watching them (she should hatch out on 6/17) and twice they have made small holes in the end of the cap and then sealed them back over.

    My question is what are they looking for or doing??

    G3
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    that is a neat observation I have never heard of. I have tried to populate a ob hive like you are doing but have had little success Keep us informed on how it goes. Maybe even post some of the details you did to help make it work
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Not doing too good on populating it. It was only one deep frame. Most of the brood has hatched out and the bottom is littered with dead bees. It is starting to get a stinking smell to it, will need to open it up and clean out tomorrow. The inside of the glass has some condensation on it. I think it needs bigger vents on it.

    Any suggestions on when I open it up?? just leave it open for a little while to let them have a cleansing flight, say maybe an hour or so??

    G3
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Are you saying they have been in the oh for 10 days without an exit? That is horrible. They should be let out each afternoon after the class, at least. Better would be to exchange frames nightly and use a new one the following day.
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Our club has a booth at the Qzark Empire fair every year, a club member lives about a mile from there. We set up two ob hives (double deeps), we take one at a time,the one that was there the first day will get to fly from his front porch the next day,( and close them up that night to go back the next day) we switch them back and forth like that for two weeks.Has always worked good.Don't know if this is any help to you G3. This Thrus., i'm taking a ob hive to the school my daughter teaches summer school, (2nd grade) the word gets passed around some how, because the kids each year ask her if her daddy is going to bring the bees to class. I don't think it's me they want to see it's the bees and the honey sticks i bring for them. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think perhaps you answer to the hole in the queen cell is... the larvae/pupae in the observation hive are overheating and the workers are looking in there to see when the dead body should be remove.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    no no you got it all wrong, I left the oh on the shady porch and pulled out one of the vent plugs which would leave them a one inch hole to fly in and out of. Not sure why there were so many dead bees in the bottom.

    Opened them up today and cleaned the bottom out, that was a fun experience with the bees flying all around.

    A nuc that I had put a queen in the other day came up queenless, not sure what happened to her, so I put the frame with the two queen cells in the nuc to give them a chance for a new queen.

    G3
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    dead bees on the bottom 'board' sounds like overheating to me which observation hives are prone to do anyway.

    higher temperature are even more lethal to queens cells than cool temperatures. which is to say a queen cell, once it is sealed, can stand a lot more cool temperatures than hot.
     
  9. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I had these some of these same problems when trying this. Make sure they are not in direct sun light. If the sun hits the glass it is like a magnifying glass. I keep my hive in the house when I have it up and running. I keep a sheet over it except for when Im looking in on them.