Question on queen cells?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by RE Jones, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    On March the 4th, I had a swarm that came out of my TBH. I caught the swarm and installed them in a 10 frame lang hive. I checked on them about two weeks ago and everything was fine, the queen was laying and they had drawn out two frames of foundationless comb.

    I opened the hive today and found a queen cell in the middle of the comb. They are on the fourth frame and there is plenty of capped brood.

    Would this be a supersedure cell? One of the frames has scattered capped brood, but the others are pretty well covered with capped brood.

    I would not think this is a swarm cell as they have only been in this hive for a month.
    Any ideas?
    Thanks, Robert
     
  2. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Since the old queen leaves with the swarm, sounds like she left with the swarm and petered out after starting to lay again, and your old queen is getting replaced because she stopped laying enough. If this was two weeks ago, you should have a new laying queen in another 7-10 days, depending on weather and luck.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    DITTO what he said.
     
  4. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's what I was thinking, I do appreciate the confirmation.

    I have no idea how old this queen is as she came with a swarm that I caught last October. I did see her while I was in the hive and she looks fat and golden. As long as her daughter has her genetics, we will be fine.
    Robert
     
  5. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just something to consider, but I know a lot of folks that try to judge the queen by her age, like, "She's too young to get replaced yet," type of thing....From what I have read, the only reason age plays a role is because of the average amount of egg laying the average queen can do in any given year. It depends on how many drones she mated with, too. Maybe bad weather on her mating flight or something else caused her to not have a full spermotheca. I think I spelled that right. But like, if you checkerboard, for example, you can use a queen up in one year because of the expanded brood nest....She has only so much sperm from however many drones, and when it's done, it's done, and prolific queens can go through their supply sooner than another queen.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a snip..
    I checked on them about two weeks ago and everything was fine

    tecumseh:
    not so oddly just about the right time and sequence where rather than this being a superscedure cell this could perhaps (you never mention whether you did or did not see the queen in your last inspection?) be an emergency reared queen cell. in addition and with no way for myself to know... any misplacement of a frame during this inspection could have created a classical case of beekeeper induced superscedure.