question

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Beeboy, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I extracted honey this past weekend and as usual I put the extractor out side to let the bees clean them up. It has been out there since Sunday morning and the bees won't touch it. I moved my honey bucket closer to the hives and still nothing. The Binney bucket is approximately thirty feet from the hives and the extractor is maybe eighty feet from the hives. I extracted about a month ago and put everything out probably 250 feet from the hives and they were on it within less than a minute. The bees don't seem that busy not as busy as they have been. Any ideas what's up?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Either there is nectar in the area, or they have no place to put it. Check if the hives are full. If not, there is a flow going on.
     

  3. Ray

    Ray Member

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    I set of a robbery doing almost that same thing. I removed some frames, that had old honey, pollen and unhatched drone cells; cut out most of the honey for crush and strain, and set the rest out. The first day at about 150ft, the bees showed no interest at all. I moved the frames up to about 100ft, and had a dozen or so bees working the frames, but that wasn't good enough. Moved the frames up to about 50ft and the frenzy started. I HAD a struggling hive, nearby... and the rest is history[​IMG].
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I have been feeding cutout honey 125 feet from hives for a week.

    First day, 2 bees. Second day, 50 bees.

    Everyday since, covered in bees.

    So far, no robbing nor fighting.
     
  5. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I was worried about robbing, but I think that would be more of a threat later in the year when there is little to no flow.
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I had some serious robbing problems last August after leaving an extractor outside to get cleaned. It's better to rinse it out with a bit of boiling water and then feed that mix back to the bees in a controlled manner. Sure the bees get a cup or two of "free" honey, but you risk some serious damage.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would guess heat. I often see the same thing here.... that is you can set out wet cappings or bits spilled honey this time of year and it seems to take days for the bees to find it.... not that long ago you could have set wet super in your truck and they would have been all over it before you could pull out of the drive way. <I suspect with high heat plants are not blooming or secreting nectar and the bees don't even send out foragers to look for such stuff.
     
  8. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I'm going with the idea that they are very busy bringing in nectar and don't have time for the free stuff. I just went and opened the hives back up and all the frames that I emptied last weekend are just about ready to harvest again. I wad totally shocked.
     
  9. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I thought that was amazing too. If you extract during a flow the wet frames seem full again almost overnight.
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    From the heat, the remaining honey could have lost more moisture and become too thick for the bees to comfortably collect it. Try spraying a bit of water on the remnants and see if they attract the bees.
    Having said that, I would not recommend trying to get the bees to feed on exposed honey. Like Pistolpete says--you can start a frenzied robbing session and you can't know what it will lead to.
     
  11. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    The bucket got a little water and watered the honey down like your saying. They didn't care. They just ignored it as usual. I cleaned it up, and put it away.
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Oh well---we tried. But I think the solution you decided on was the best. :thumbsup:
     
  13. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    And I thank you for trying. I love this forum. There is a lot of wisdom & experience on here that us yung ens can really benefit from. I know I don't say thank you enough, but thank you. You guys have helped me in so many ways. I appreciate it.