Questions - Yesterday We Dd Our First Cut Out

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by HisPalette, May 26, 2012.

  1. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The cut out we just did yesterday was a bit trying, and I am not 100% sure we got the queen. :doh:Think so, but these ladies are so shook up it is hard to say... From a dark messy old condemned house and they were so happy until we took their house...Gosh I hope we got her.
    First try we cut all the comb and brood, unknown to us she ran...
    WE waited to see them marching into the hive... no marching.
    The second try at 6"30 at night - a huge basketball size cluster, like a swarm essentially, on the same wall. I made a makeshift slide so the queen couldn't fall around the back of the box and I cupped in my hands and arms around the entire cluster and raked them into the super box...and covered it. It appeared we go the queen this time...others trying to get into the box etc.

    Steve checked on the way to work and says some are still going into and out of the old house, but appear disorganized..

    Question 1:
    Could there have been 2 queens?
    P1010030.JPG
    this photo almost looks like 2 separate colonies - note the square shaped brood at the bottom and the festoon shaped brood about 2 feet away...There appeared 2 separate knot hole entrances to the same wall space in addition to many open cracks in the clapboards.
    The hive we took home is acting like a normal colony with the in and out traffic. They are still upset and do try to back us up some but not frenzied.

    Question 2:
    If we go back in there Monday (Steve is working all weekend) and there is another cluster, we can't add them to the existing hive then can we??? or would we have to start another hive with those and add a queen if needed.

    Question 3:
    They are 150 yards down the road. Is this close enough for the other hive mates to find the new beeyard???...Similar to moving a hive across a farm yard, I suppose...based on Steve still seeing traffic into and out of the old house.
     
  2. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A clearer picture...
    P1010031.JPG
     

  3. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh probably a silly question, about 2 queens. The square brood looks like it was probably from the middle and was cut when the top of the sheet rock was...Duh!

    If we didn't get the original queen on the second try and go back again...Now can we add all that to the original take. (question2)
     
  4. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Answering 1 of my own questions a bit...

    I was not wild about going into the beeyard, let alone the hives today... as i am still itching from defenders of the cut out....:chased:
    but the Curiosity got the best of me... I opened the hive from the cut out and definitely found the queen looks to be in really good shape!
    :thumbsup: :grin: :dance: :Dancing: :yahoo:
    Now if there is a swarm in the old house then... I guess we will have #5?
     
  5. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's awesome you found the queen....I am not an expert on question #2 but I would not see any problems combining them if only a few days have passed....
     
  6. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Glad you found the queen
    Something I found helps me get the Queen when doing a cut out is
    If (like yours) bees are everywhere and no Queen and job its winding down
    I'll take and place a piece of comb"usually leave one"
    out away from studs or other crawl spaces,I'll then close
    the hole if possible then go about cleaning up
    after a bit I will check the comb with luck she will be there
    but remember to be quick or she'll scoot away again

    Tommyt
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You cannot add them to the hive. They have forgotten their hivemates within 48 hours. You can shake them out on the ground in front of the other hives and let them walk in. They will be accepted that way.

    The bees returning to the house were returning foragers or clean up bees removing the spilled honey.
     
  8. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks Iddee!
    I thought so - We will gather them if there is a significant amount. Would some of them possibly have already found there way here already 150 yards away? and just been cleaning up?
    Everything, I studied went askew when the brood and comb came out with Ron's first cut.... I remember you said in a former post to uncover all comb before beginning. Too late when it came out on him!


    Then no light to see the queen...
    Thanks tommyt!
    We will use that idea next time with the comb.

    Yes! Blueblood
    Wicked awesome to find her!...She was in the middle of a little ball in the corner of the box when I added some new foundation...She forgot to tuck in her tail!!! I said by golly there you are! I poked it to get a good visual to be sure...She looked like our very first Minnesota queen from last May...I think she swarmed early, after our January/February crazy weather. I found a shredded swarm cell and one more ready to hatch, on the very first inspection this spring...Oops!
     
  9. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh!!! most important we did not see a single varroa mite or SHB the entire time sorting through everything (dislodged larva) etc. - how old might it be I was guessing 3 months? or 3 brood cycles?
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The ones 150 yards away may have went back to gather the spoils. I would move the stragglers at dark.
     
  11. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We went back this evening to retrieve the stragglers...There was another huge cluster same size as when we got the queen - We got them into a box too and now they are acting like a queened colony. Could there have been two queens or were they just going after the scent that still remained on the wall from the queen we got on Friday?
     
  12. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for sharing this info. I have yet to attempt a cutout so I learned some things. The picture was helpful as well.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would think one queen. Shake them out in front of the other, like you would a swarm, and let them walk in the entrance.
     
  14. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Awesome! A parade of happy honeys! :cool:
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,692
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I had 2 queens in one house, separate openings, on a cutout I did this spring. One hive was in the sloping soffet going up toward a peak, the other in a much larger soffet area horizontally behind a gutter. I think the photos are on here somewhere. When they start spinning off swarms, sometimes the swarms don't move too far. The smaller hive was robbed out by the large one I'd brought home the day before. But everyone acted queen right. Trouble with bees, they don't read the books!