R values

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by BjornBee, Jan 27, 2010.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Anybody know what the R-value of a standard piece of 1 inch (3/4")pine wood is?

    I have some two inch pink insulation I want to cut up for nuc tops. It is rated as R-7.5

    What does it mean for each additional base point. Is 7.5 approximately double the insulating value of something like R-4?

    Thank you.
     
  2. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    I think that it is the same per inch as the foam. But I'm not sure.
     

  3. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Thank you Mark. I was thinking the same as you. I thought it was close.

    Ok, I of course went to that site wikipedia :roll: and came up with this....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R-value_(insulation)#Typical_per-inch_R-values_for_material
    * Click on R value insulations link at the top.
    Near the bottom they have R values for standard materials.

    Looks like I'll be going from 1.4 with soft wood tops, to 7.5 with the stuff I have now.

    Now I wonder if that same R value would be good for keeping the sun's heat from the top of the nucs, or would it just keep that much more heat in the nucs? I know the nuc tops just seem to bake in the sun, and without inner covers, I often wondered if this was good or not.

    I know the bricks I use to hold the tops on sometimes are hot enough that it's almost too hot to touch. So maybe the foam would be a barrier of sorts.

    Anyone have anything they feel helps? Anyone use foamboard? I would be interested in finding out how long they last and do they get damaged from propolis seals and then lifting them, etc?

    Thank you.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have made a few tops for baby nucs out of double foil backed foam board. it does seem to help with the heat build up... but you gotta' keep a brick on them to keep any wind from blowing them away they are so light.
     
  5. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I my self made intercovers for my nucs, I also place a hunk inside the outercover for isulation of both the cold and heat. A friend just covers the frames with hunks of feed bags which I think are plastic now. Reduces proplis on his top covers.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  6. the kid

    the kid New Member

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    I did insulation years ago ,, then a company that made the insulation started instaling it ,,, you can not compete
    with them ,, they would under cut any price you gave . they could do it for less then the insulation would cost me .

    Fir or pine boards per inch 1.3

    R" value
    The "R" value is a measure of a material's ability to resist the flow of heat. The higher the "R" value, the better the insulation qualities of the material.

    "R" is an additive quality. Two inches of a given material will have approximately twice the "R" value of 1 inch. Also, the individual "R" values for all materials in a section of a structure can be added together to obtain a total "R" value.

    Several years ago, most insulation material was either mineral wool or fiber glass. These materials have similar insulating properties, and it became common practice to specify insulation in terms of inches of thickness. Today, many different insulations are on the market, and each has its own characteristics. The only fair way to compare their insulation ability is to compare "R" values.
    I
     
  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    According to my 1875 house, any quantity of "R" value is pretty much negated by leaks and drafts that allow wind to pass through.

    Good info there, kid. And easy to understand.