Raising a queen in an observation hive.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DLMKA, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I was talking to the principal at my kid's school tonight about putting an observation hive there for a few days to, well, be observed. What would be more cool than removing the queen and watching them build emergency queen cells?!?! Since they'd have to be contained as the principal didn't think that offering an outside entrance was a good idea and inside the district insurance policy, I'm wondering if they could be left contained for the 16 or so days it takes for the new queen to emerge. I'd take the ob hive out about the time the queen would need to go on mating flights and bring them back after she's had a week or so for taking care of some business :thumbsup:.

    Is this an acceptable plan? I'd obviously have 1:1 sugar and water available to whole time.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Bees just MIGHT want to use the restroom within 16 days. Wouldn't you?

    I would suggest taking the OB in on day 14 and letting the queen emerge on day 16, then take it home. 3 days would be acceptable to the bees.
     

  3. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    That was my concern.

    The hope was I could leave it there for a day or two with a laying queen, bring it home for a day or so and remove the queen and bring it back so they could see the q cell building process. At what point do the q cells become sensitive to movement? I'd just hate to damage a queen pupae taking the hive out for bathroom breaks every few days.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Too much movement is never good, and I would think several moves might provide enough stress on the colony that anything could happen.