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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Been a very productive day...captured my 3rd swarm and installed drip irrigation and plastic in the garden. Planted 40 tomato plants I started from seed. It has been the best year to date for me with starting from seed. I truly believe tranferring the seedlings in proper potting soil and bigger pots as soon as the real leaves emerge is key.
 

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Medic, be careful what you wish for. If we had that space imagine the taxes we'd be paying on it here in NY! lol!
 

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Oooo...I haz a jealous! All that space...and a drip system, I'm green as a frog with envy here.

I'm building a small tomato hut I designed for my tomatoes and peppers this year. Every year I've had plants full of gorgeous tomatoes about an inch wide (non-cherries) right around...September and our first frost. *sigh* So, going for the tomato house this year to try to actually get a good harvest. I made my little hut collapsable so it can fold down and store over winter...I'll likely spam the garden forum here with pics once I put it up!

I, too have had a good year with indoor starts. And yes, I think soil is a HUGE factor in that. I actually bought a starter soil my local nursery carries and the difference from previous years when I was just using a regular garden soil mixed with compost or whatever, is just amazing.

I have not transferred them at all, but I planted them all in newspaper pots, about 3 inches across and 6 deep. As the tomatoes have grown, I add a bit more soil into the pots so they should have some good deep roots by time I put them outside. I've started taking them outdoors a little while each day, and I'm increasing it a bit at a time, so they'll be ready for transplant in about another week.

I only have 6 though, not 40!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I couldn't be more pleased with the results I am seeing from the combination of the drip system and plastic this season. It is bone dry here but my garden has been watered consistently for 5 minutes every 6 hours. The leaves on my tomatoes are dark green and full. The stems are thick and strong too. The plastic does a great job of keeping the soil warm and preventing weeds from choking the produce. I am withing a couple of days from staking the tomatoes.
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I'm glad that's working out for you! I know plastic keeps the weeds down. Down here, if I use plastic, I get a hand full of fire ants when I go to pick stuff. They love the moist wet warm dirt.

Luckily it's been raining regularly here lately, so my garden is doing well. I'll try to post some pictures later today.
 

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Oh, yeah, I can see how ants would love that...we had those red ants in my hometown, Evansville. I have not seen them much here. Looking forward to seeing your garden pics...
 

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I use pondliner to block weeds in the garden, and yes fireants love it, so I use beneficial nematodes, which stay nice and moist and hungry under the pondliner and eat the fireants.
 

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I had to Google nematodes......worms!
Special worms. Microscopic worms. Some nematodes attack tomato roots. These don't. but they do eat ants and grubs, and seem to catch chiggers in their on the ground reproductive stage, meaning, where I use them my yard doesn't have chiggers. They occur naturally in healthy soil, but droughts kill them off. I used to replenish mine every 2 years, put down with a miracle gro sprayer. Had to do them this year, I just couldn't keep yard and garden moist enough during the drought, had a couple of fire ant hills. Don't have them anymore. (little black ants nesting somewhere out of reach though..)

Gypsi
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, ain't that nifty...I had never heard about them or their benefit. Where can a person obtain them?
 

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Feed store. Not cheap but treat them
Right and like bees, they multiply
 

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Here's a picture of some of the garden. Corn on the left, beans in the middle, some late okra (I think) and squash on the right. The tomatoes are the next row (behind the squash). If it will keep raining, the garden will keep growing.

 

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Greg,with the woods that close to your garden, don't the ***** get into the corn? I just got through putting up an Electric fence (4 strans) around an acre of sweet corn, it's the only thing i've found to keep them out. (well most of the time:roll:) Jack
 

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Greg,with the woods that close to your garden, don't the ***** get into the corn? I just got through putting up an Electric fence (4 strans) around an acre of sweet corn, it's the only thing i've found to keep them out. (well most of the time:roll:) Jack
I have a 4-ft chicken wire fence all around it. But there's mice that get through the holes and nibble at the tomotoes. Bambi jumps over the fence. But it keeps Thumper out and since I've reinforced the bottom, the ground hogs don't dig under it. It is a challenge to keep the varmits out.
 

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I don't have a picture, but the gals are working the squash flowers like crazy today. I do have a picture of my mother holding one of the six spinach plants we put out this spring. We're pulling them up because they're finally starting to bolt (that would be good for the bees, but we'd rather eat the spinach). It's an Australian type that is supposed to resist bolting.

 
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