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With spring approaching, there will be calls from concerned citizens wanting "THESE BEES GONE".
Some beeks will be doing removals, so I'm starting this thread for posting experiences and "how to" hints from your removals. I am also making it a sticky for easy reference when you have a call, so be explicit with your methods, so others can be helped.
Thanks

Who wants to start???
 

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Bee Catcher said:
With spring approaching, there will be calls from concerned citizens wanting "THESE BEES GONE".
Some beeks will be doing removals, so I'm starting this thread for posting experiences and "how to" hints from your removals. I am also making it a sticky for easy reference when you have a call, so be explicit with your methods, so others can be helped.
Thanks

Who wants to start???
was it you that explained to me how to make a vacuum that catches bees? If so, could you please explain how to build/assemble a vacuum to capture bees?
 

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Hi Guy's

The method I use is with a skep, (which I am led to beleive are not permitted in the USA).
With any swrm I spray a very fine mist of water over them to cool them down. I then place the skep either under the swarm or in a position to brush the bees into the skep.
Previous to this I will have laid a sheet out near the swarm so as when I turn the skep the correct way it sits on a board and sheet. The sheet is for when the bees have finished flying and are all in the skp I tie the sheet up and carry the whole bundle to the van.

When I get them to an out apiary I will have a Nuc ready to put the swarm into, therefor allowing me to 'dust the bees with icing sugar' to drop any Varroa mites. The floor of the Nuc will have a piece of thin plastic covered in jelly to ensure the mites do not climb back into the bees.
I can now asess the characteristics of the swarm and re-queen if ness. After they have been in the Nuc for a couple of weeks I would then transfer them to a normal hive.









There are occassions when a 'Bait hive' will be used, as I allways smear the foundation with a solution of honey to entice the bees in.

Regards;
 

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Hey guy's. what can I say!

I did not realise that what you were talking about was a huge task as shown in the photo.
I have never been called to anything as big as what is shown, and now I understand why you have the vacume to suck up the bees.

My apologies to you all.

Regards;
 

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hey there bee catcher glad to see ya. To all who may not know his reputation he be the GURU on Shirtless bee removals. Heck any removal he be the guru and go to guy for advice.
 

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If there is anyone here in the south central kansas area that would like to be a part of a cutouot I am doing one march 8th. They are welcome to tag along and learn. I know it is to early to be doing a cutout but they got to go. I am going to try and use them to populate my new OB hive I am picking up Sat.
 

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I did a removal last week.
It was in a 100 yr old house w/ the bees under the upper story floor under the window and above the first floor ceiling.
The owner supplied the scaffolding(thank God!). The owner was re-siding the house so no recovering needed(again thank God!).I brought 2 helpers, a bee-vac, several plastic buckets(w/ lids) to put comb brood and honey in, 5 gal jug water for clean up and thirst, knifes to cut comb, rubber bands to attach comb to frames, flashlight, hammer, skill saw, pry bars, a screened in deep box for transpot and a spare deep just in case it was huge!!!
I opened it up w/ a skill saw(normally centered down a stud for reattachment), vacuumed some bee's, cut the comb out one pc @ a time. I got honeycomb first so I saved it in buckets broken and dirty comb to feed the bee's, and clean comb saved for me and the owner. I then had to wash up the messy honey from everything! Then came the brood comb which I rubber banded to the frame in the exact position as removed both up and down and left and right I put them in the deep w/ the lid open, I vacuumed up more bee's being careful not to suck too hard and kill the girls. Finally once I had most the bees I started to clean up. I noticed the bees didnt seem to congragate to the deep w/ the brood making me think the Queen wasnt caught yet. I inspected the cut out more and found a group of bees had moved over to the next frame in the flooring. I sucked them up got the queen and cleaned up @ dusk. Went home w/ a big group of bee's, $150.00 cash and a smile for having so much fun!!! Oh yeah, NOT 1 single sting or honery bee!!!(unlike my 1st cutout when I got over 70 confirmed stings). I went back the next day and only found 10-20 bee's left. This week the girls are doing well. Now brood and comb being built.
I'm looking at a chordless(battery powered) pwr tool kit w/ a skillsaw, sawzall, drill and maybee a hand vacuum to complete my cutout kit. Any recomendations? Skill, Craftsman, Porter, DeWalt all have them.
 

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I am writing from Jackson, WY. A friend in the midst of a construction project has discovered a very big hive in the roof, under some soffit. It's stained a long section of the wood and bees go in and out in several places as much as 20' apart. He called me because he knows I have some bees, (exactly one hive for a couple of years!)
Doing anything here seems a little out of my league, but he doesn't want to kill the hive, so if there were a pro nearby, he'd probably hire him.
Short of that, he'd salvage what he could and try to save the bees, too. But he's gotta get on with the new roof.
Any and all suggestions welcome. I'm looking around western WY/eastern ID, but I'm still looking.
 
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