Removals

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Iddee, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. Andrew Carson

    Andrew Carson New Member

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    Good morning -- thanks, I'll follow up on the links. I am very curious as to what's going on inside and hope we can find some experienced hands to pitch in.
     
  2. jajtiii

    jajtiii New Member

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    What are the general steps that folks take when doing a cut-out? Or is each one so different that there are no global steps.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    That's a hard question. You are asking me to write a book.
    If it's not your home, the list is endless, even before you take the job.

    Once started, the most important is:
    1. Uncover all comb before starting removal.
    2. Remove all comb around brood before removing broodcomb.

    All the rest sort of falls in place as you go, with each job being different.
     
  4. jajtiii

    jajtiii New Member

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    I am really asking for a high level summary. As an example, I work for a large electric company on the east coast. I can assure you that the process of generating electricity via fossil, nuclear or merchant means, is more complicated then doing a cut out.

    But, I have a team of 6 managers, all of whom can individually summarize the process with 10 bullet points to me (each one providing slight variations of course, but the overall theme would be the same).

    I am not saying that everyone has the ability to summarize or provide high level overviews, but if someone on this forum does, I am interested in seeing them.

    To provide some assistance, the outline of such a post might look like this:

    1. Prep
    2. Analysis
    3. Test Run
    4. Implementation

    Your answer assumes that I have already read a book.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Sorry, I would like to help, but it is beyond my ability. Maybe a telephone call? If so, I'll PM you my number, or make the call if you PM me yours.
     
  6. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I got my first removal call of the year... I was going to try to steer clear of removals, but since there have been like NO swarms in TN this year, I'll take what I can get at this point. I'm going to assess the situation tomorrow, but weather-wise I won't even be able to schedule a day to do it because there is no day in the forecasted future that will be ideal. This cold front needs to move on first.
     
  7. Monie

    Monie New Member

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    I finally got a call off my Craigslist ad. The gentleman has an "old farmhouse " that has bees in the exterior wall about 8' up. I may have to do a trapout. He's not sure he wants his wall cut into. I can see his point. Around here, most older houses, and there are a lot of them, are plaster and lath; AKA a honkin' mess. I'm going out after work, to check it out.
     
  8. Monie

    Monie New Member

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    Looks like I'll be doing a trapout. I gave the gentleman my prices and the option. The good news is that it's right next to the exterior stairway. They gained entry through the rotting window sill. I'll have to fill big gaps and come up with a plan for adjustable legs for the platform, because I hate only using something once. The bad news is that it's a 2 story house and looks like it's 30 feet from ground to peak and the roof is a 12/12 pitch. YIKES! I hope to God there are no other holes. It was raining today, and I didn't see any bees coming from any other area, but that doesn't mean they're not there. I'll spend some time checking when it clears up to be sure. BTW those girls are gentle as all get out! Even with this crappy weather, it didn't bother them one bit that I was fooling around with their "doorway".
     
  9. brendantm130

    brendantm130 New Member

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    If you wanted to use the lumber over again, with the option to get higher the next time, cut two shorter pieces that you could attach to the legs with two bolts and wing nuts. Then you could just drill through and attach according to hight needed.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The platform doesn't have to be at the top of the legs. Just use screws and mount it at the height you need. Let the legs stick out above it.

    BE SURE you get all possible holes plugged the first time. Once they find an alternative entrance, they will look harder the next time.
     
  11. Monie

    Monie New Member

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    Since the platform legs would be on the stairway, and their tenant uses those stairs, I opted for screwing a couple of boards to the side of the house and attaching the platform to those.

    Yes, Iddee, I plan to spend some time looking for other holes. Thanks for the pm. :)
     
  12. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    i thought you all mite enjoy this one. I got a bee call for a swarm that had settled at a local walmart i got home about 9 that evening just getting dark when my son gave me the message i had to go to st Louis early in the morning so i headed out and went to get the swarm it was on a pallet of shelving almost to the top of the store. and a fair sized swarm I got the ladder and set a nuc box over the top of the bees and they started to crawl up into the box. while stand up there waiting on them to get into the box a walmart asset protection employee came with a fork lift and said i couldn't be standing on the top row of shelving because of store policy so he went and got a fork lift and moved the pallet of shelving to the ground. it sure would have been nice if they had done this earlier but no one wanted to do it for fear of being stung but once i was up there without a veil hiving the bees they decided they might be safe. stick with me now heres the kicker. I climb down the ladder and he slowly lowered the pallet to the ground he has the headlights on on the fork lift so i told him he had better turn them off as bees at night are attracted to light. after i finished hiving the swarm. he was telling me that the night before a load of bees had pulled into the parking lot about 8:30 for the night he had to go and run off the trucker and tell him he cant stay there about 30 minutes after he had arrrived. it wasnt the beees the walmart store has a no truck parking policy. with that being said what do you bet i got a box full of queenless lost bees that got left behind when he left. oh well got 40 bucks in my pocket and some bees i can use to boost a weak swarm i picked up the night before. i will give them a few days to see if there might by a slim chance a queen
     
  13. Monie

    Monie New Member

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    Well, some bees is better than no bees! :) And you got 40 bucks too! Good for you!!!
     
  14. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    As long as you don't try to knife them on federal property. :shock: :twisted: :D :D
     
  15. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    goodmorning iddee they had they knife out of my possession in seconds without force well its off to the shrine hosipital and then the 7 hour drive home
     
  16. HoneyBeeMan

    HoneyBeeMan New Member

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    Just joined this site. Live in Murfreesboro, TN. I have completed a lot of cutouts this year.

    3 from trees: 1 already down, 1 called because crew wouldn't work with bees (screened off entrances) and 1 from a cedar tree that I cut down (owner wanted both done).

    3 from apartment buildings: 2 were behind stone facade and 1 of those was 20' up.

    4 (that I can think of) from homes: 1 from a house built in 1920 and the bees were at least 24' up from the ground. Did everything on that one from inside.

    Trapouts: 2

    Swarms: 3 or 4 (that were not mine). 1 at night at a FedEx Ground terminal.

    Hoping to do 1 in SC and 1 in CT next year. Both are jobs that no one will tackle. SC job the bees have been there continuously since 1980.

    Enjoy cutouts but they are hard, hot and at times dangerous. Sometimes it's best to say no than to take a job that will potential kill you or break a lot of bones.
     
  17. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    And that is the end of the thread. Wow. What was with the knife on federal property?
     
  18. beeshaman

    beeshaman New Member

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    How do you get a wild hive you have collected to transfer across from their comb to my frames , their in a Nuc box with three frames and natural bee comb/brood & pollen little honey , do you slowly introduce frames and remove comb ?
     
  19. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    beeshaman I do not know where your location is but if you are north of the equator do not put frames that are not draw in now, you will cause the bees to freeze for they need the cells to stay warm in the winter. Only add undrawed frames in the spring when they is a flow on.

    ‚ÄčKen