Removing Ground Rods

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by riverbee, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i would like some ideas to remove 3 ground rods to be replaced by new ones for my bear fence around my hives. the current rods are galvanized, i do not know if they are 6 ft or 8 ft long, they were placed by the previous owner and have been in the ground for some time.

    taking a sledgehammer to them and pounding them into the ground or cutting them off is not an option. my hives are located in a long term/permanent location, so i do not want a ‘ground rod graveyard’ collection, for replacement purposes and the location of the 3 rods has natural runoff from rain water.
    i do have some ideas but want some thoughts from others. :confused:
    thanks in advance :grin:
     
  2. dr.buzz

    dr.buzz New Member

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    I don't have ground rods, but I've got really hard ground that makes pulling up T-posts a nightmare. There are two ways that are cool if you find yourself without a front end loader or anything with a bucket, but it might be hard to picture....The easiest to explain is this: Put your car jack (it can be a pump jack, scissor jack, floor jack, whatever) on the ground right next to what you want to pull straight up out of the ground (in your case a ground rod) and wrap a rope, strap, chain, whatever around your rod, and attach the other end to your jack. How you attach it to your jack depends on what kind of jack you use, but hopefully after the first 6 inches that you jack it up, it will just slide out.

    The other way is too hard to describe, I'll find a video on Youtube......

    Here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bINj4V8o3KY
     

  3. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    without a bucket or three point hitch it's a bit more difficult like Dr. buzz says.

    With a bucket or hitch a chain attached to the bucket or hitch and then wrapped around the ground rod and looped over itself should pull it right out.
    Without, a saw horse with the chain attached to a 2x4 and some leverage on the long end could work "almost" as well. If using the wood method I'd work in small increments lest you snap the wood.
    Good luck.

    Keith
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you are just going to put more in why are you pulling the existing ones up?
     
  5. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Leverage. I've jambed a 4x4 up against the rod, right under a clamp, used a piece of wood for a fulcrum, and jumped on the other end of the 4x4.
     
  6. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Those are some innovative ideas, fun to see! :thumbsup:
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    It's all a question of what tools you have at your disposal. My suggestion is a variation/combination of some previous suggestions.
    Use a "vice-wrench" to clamp onto the rods, get a good crow-bar to fit under it and use a good board as support for the fulcrum of the crow bar. Each time you get the rod a little higher, the vice-grip can be quickly moved lower down again to enable the next lift.
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    some great ideas for pulling these out, the guys with the buckets are the guys that told me to bury them or cut them off, farmers bury everything or shove it to the river’s edge when the spring floods come through…..anyone looking for some tires?

    doc buzz, i liked the you tube video with the tire rim. i don’t have a tire rim, may have to see if one of the farmers does…..lol. t posts are stinkers, i just yank them out with the 4 wheel horse, most of mine have been in for 30 yrs or more, so will not reuse them. the jack idea was my first thought as well, just figuring out how to attach.

    g3, some troubleshooting, the rods appear to be the problem. one of the older farmers said he thought they had been in for 30 years.

    ef said: “it's all a question of what tools you have at your disposal.â€

    TOOLS ef?:
    :lol:
    bumper jack, floor jack, bottle jack, log chain, lots of rope, straps, heavy duty saw horses, 2 x 4’s, 4x 4’s, rock bar, assorted crow bars, vise grips, pipe wrenches, heavy duty ladder, 4 wheel horse with a winch on the front end.

    i like the jack ideas. i thought maybe i’d water the rods down, take a pipe wrench and see if i couldn’t twist them a bit, set the ladder (multi position type) over the rod, (with some weight on it to keep from tipping) throw the winch cable (from the 4 wheel) over a rung on the ladder, attach it to the rod, push the button and see if couldn’t get them up that way. if it doesn’t work i’ll go to one of the jacks and chain with a cheater pipe on it.

    what do you think?
    funny thing is i will pull them up and find they are only 3 ft long....:lol:
     
  10. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    OK, I've got the solution to your troubles:

    you'll need (in no particular order):
    • two hive bodys
    • at least one medium super
    • a package of bees
    • one 2x4
    • 6 acres of clover
    • a hive tool
    • a pipe clamp
    • water and 6lbs of sugar
    • a see-saw from the local play yard
    • a length of rope.

    Place the see-saw with one seat directly over the rod. clamp the clamp over the rod . Place 2x4 under the opposite seat. Attach the rope to the rod (under the clamp) and to the seat (the one over the see-saw). You may now remove the 2x4. As a side note if you have two 12inch wide logs available you can make a bench out of the 2x4 to watch this all happen later.
    Lastly, place the hive on the second seat and install the package and feeder with sugar water. This should place the rope under tension.
    Now we wait for the bees to do their things. As the colony grows you can install the second deep and then the super. Once the seat of the hive side is touching the ground the rod should be out of the ground. If not, reuse the 2x4 (carefully the bees might not be too keen on this whole process), move the clamp down the rod and reattach the rope and repeat until you meet with success!


    If it's not painfully obvious. I'm heavily medicated and bored silly from staying home from work today. Be excellent to one another!
    :wave:
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Riverbee:... bumper jack, floor jack, bottle jack, log chain, lots of rope, straps, heavy duty saw horses, 2 x 4’s, 4x 4’s, rock bar, assorted crow bars, vise grips, pipe wrenches, heavy duty ladder, 4 wheel horse with a winch on the front end.

    Efmesch: Use a different tool-combination/method with each rod and report which worked best.
    :thumbsup:
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Use a large piece of firewood, PRE- split, instead of a wheel.
     
  13. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    They can be corroded to nearly twice diameter and quite tough to break loose initially. Dig a bit of a hole and sledge them down an inch or so to break free. My hoist of choice would be a "come-a-long" (lever chain hoist) not much trouble to throw together a tripod of pipe or 4x4's like you see in redneck backyards pulling car engines. Small chain or cable with a clove hitch, topped by a couple half hitches will get hold of the rod.

    Video the event for the forum!
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    papa keith, now thats some funny stuff you said there, i don't have a teeter totter but i do have part of a jungle jim brought courtesy of river flooding:grin:
    iddee i do have split firewood....so add that to my collection of 'tools'. i was sort of eyeing up an old steel hose reel....hmmmmm:lol:

    crofter, happy you chimed in here, i think you are right on the corrosion. already tried to turn them, they are not budging to good. add sledge hammers to my tool collection....i don't have any 'redneck materials' for a tripod, well, i don't think!

    i will do my best on the videotape....if my brothers were around, this would probably bring some pretty good entertainment....i won't get to it now for a couple days, but will post the results.

    neighbor just called about 1/2 mile away, spotted an adult black bear in his front yard tearing down a bird feeder.....
     
  15. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Add the bear to your tool list. I'm sure it has plenty of "pull power". All you have to do is train it.:rotfl:
     
  16. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

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    Just use a piece of pipe either galvanized or PVC that will easily fit over the ground rod,then buy a hose bib fitting(at Lowes or HD)(that fits the size pipe you're using)then hook the hose to the pipe and jet down using water pressure,then simply lift the rod out.
     
  17. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Map the old ground rods well, drive the new ones and save removal for another time; get that fence operational. Bears are easier to train than they are to retrain! Dont let them get one lick of your honey.

    Is it because the old rods may have lost ground function that you want them gone, or that they present a potentially unwanted ground path for lightning?
     
  18. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    crackerbee, thanks for this interesting suggestion, have you tried this? i do have some pvc and hose bib fittings.

    crofter,
    thanks, the fence is operational right now, the bear will have to stumble across 3 unprotected hives in the neighbors apple orchard before it finds mine.
    "Is it because the old rods may have lost ground function that you want them gone, or that they present a potentially unwanted ground path for lightning?

    i am getting volt meter readings on wires higher than another, after troubleshooting wires and insulators, everything is good, so this tells me my ground rods have deteriorated, and no doubt they are. as i said, i have no idea how long they have been in the ground.....too long if i don't know. better to replace them now, with the knowledge of when they went in, how long they are and put there myself. i am a perfectionist with this fence, if it fails i lose, and so do the bees. happened once, won't happen again.:grin:
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Crackerbee's suggestion is simply brilliant. I suggest that you try his method first.
     
  20. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i don't know ef, i like what you suggested before, "try some combination of the tools and report back....".:lol: