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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There seems to be some discussion that various treatments reduce a queens potential. I was wondering about pulling them out during hive treatment but is there any method(pheremones), etc. that could prevent the workers from sensing the queenless condition and producing emergency cells.
 

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you pull the queen your going to get emergency cells if you have eggs or up to 3 day old larva. Not sure what your treating with. IMHO if you have to remove the queen for fear that it is going to harm her. It isnt going to do the other bees much good either. I would look for another option to treat
 

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If the treatment is that hard what is it doing to the rest of the hive??

What are you treating for and treating with??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The 10 hives are all acquired this spring except one is a captured swarm. Will be doing mite counts soon and gathering information for treatment program for this fall.

From what I am led to believe the various treatments with formic acid often cause bee mortality. Is the new, pending approval strips much different according to experience from actual users? I think perhaps one does not have to outright kill a queen to compromise her fertility or longevity potential. More frequent requeening seems connected with the reality of some of the more common treatment regimes.

The gist of the question I guess is there any way of preventing the otherwise automatic production of emergency cells if the queen is pulled. Can you trick the bees into thinking they still have a queen?
 

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According to the feedback I have received, The new strips have a much heavier bee mortality rate. Some whole hives have been wiped out.
 

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Take the lack of a direct answer to your question as an answer.
The closest you can come to removing her, without actually doing so is by confining her in a cage to a selected part of the hive.
An easy cage to make is a tube of rolled window screen, folded or stapled on one side before you put her it and then closed by folding or stapling it on the other side to lock her in. If you place the cage between two frames in the uppermost super (assuming that the treatment will be applied to the brood box on the bottom), the bees will know that their queen is with them but she'll be out of harm's way. But don't keep her locked up too long or they might give up on her lack of laying and try to raise a replacement queen from a larva too old to be of much good.
 
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