report on honey extraction

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by pistolpete, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Well, the big day(s) were finally here. Saturday morning I went to a friends place to help him with his hives. Then we came back to my place and removed three deeps to put on a vortex bee escape board with an empty box between the escape and the two brood deeps. Quite a bit of awkward lifting inside my bee shed to get all that done.

    About 6 hours later I removed the frames and brought them in. At that point there were about 5 to 10 bees/frame left, which I blew off with my mouth. It seems to me that blowing them off like that is a good way to inhale a bee, so I may try brushing next time. I did not use smoke for this part of it and one bee crawled into my hair and let me have it. That was my first "unprovoked" sting.

    Sunday I set up in the kitchen and started uncapping and extracting into some buckets I got free from a bakery. made a honey gate for the 5 gallon bucket out of a one inch irrigation shutoff valve from the hardware store. Next time I will use a larger diameter, because it takes forever to drain.

    My wife posted the honey for sale on a local facebook page. Sold 70 pounds at $5/lb within a day. That's all our surplus. Today I finished extracting the rest. Total so far this year is 140 lbs from one hive that was started as a 4 frame nuc at the end of may. There's probably another 30 pounds of surplus in the hive that they have not capped. I am totally amazed by the amount the bees have produced. What a great way to start out in beekeeping. honeytime.jpg
     
  2. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    That's very good results. Congrats
     

  3. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Which is a very clear indication that you underpriced your honey!

    Congrats on a great first year!
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Congratulations. :thumbsup:
     
  5. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    Wow! Great work by you and your bees.
     
  6. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    This is where all that hard work pays off. Great job.:thumbsup:
     
  7. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    That may be, but I went with the going price around here. $5 was a bring your own container to my house kind of a deal. I think we could have sold another 100 lbs, but I'm glad we did not have that much. All that extracting is hard work.
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Pete, reading your report made me feel real happy for you. It even brought back memories of how I felt sooooo many years ago, when I first got a yield of honey that was way beyond the ability of my family to eat it all. Have no regrets--you sold it for the price you asked. Just wait till next year, your customers, and their friends, will be banging at your door for more. Everyone is happy when you sell for a fair price. :thumbsup:
    But always remember to keep enough set aside for your own family's needs. Don't become a "barefoot shoemaker".
     
  9. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Love the beautiful frame of capped honey in the photo!....and the (sticky?) socks.... :D
     
  10. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    If they're not sticky yet, they will be-there can be no other substance on the face of the earth that spreads more stickiness from one minuscule drop that escaped!
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Fantastic! I kept enough honey for my family to eat on through the winter but sold the rest. I sold mine for $6/pound. My honey was gone withing a few days. The money went in a jar for bee stuff I want to buy over the winter when I am bored.
     
  12. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Gratz pistolpete, nice 1st year a, I sold my extra for $6/lb also its amazing how fast it goes but it has my wife so into honey selling and candle making that she said we need alot more hives (gotta love that women) well, Im not real sure I want more hives (ya right:lol:) I guess its time for buying more boxes:wink:
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a pistolpete snip..
    That may be, but I went with the going price around here. $5 was a bring your own container to my house kind of a deal. I think we could have sold another 100 lbs, but I'm glad we did not have that much. All that extracting is hard work.

    tecumseh:
    all beekeeper want to sell their honey. some want more and some less but everyone want their crop to move towards being consumed. if there is a rule here it is you should not enter a market and significantly uncut the price of the existing bee keeper's price. low balling price sets a ball moving in the wrong direction and pretty soon every beekeeper will be selling at a loss and not long after this even the customers will suffer since there will be no beekeeper (or at least none producing honey).
     
  14. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I did check around. At local fairs and stores, local honey sells for $6 or7, bottled in glass jars. So I put mine up for $7 bottled, or $5 if you bring your own jars.
     
  15. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    That frame of honey is just gorgeous, gratz on a great honey year.


    I like the idea of "bring your own container" sales. I may see about setting that up myself when I start selling my honey, encourages recycling and saves time and money for myself, it's a win-win!
     
  16. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    i had a 5 gallon bucket with a honey gate set up on the kitchen counter so that we could fill up people's containers with a minimum of hassle and mess. I put up a price of $5/lb for bringing your own containers and $7/lb for pre-bottled in mason jars, most people brought their own. The wood frames look great, but many of the wood frames with wax foundation blew out during extracting, because I did not cross wire the foundation. Next year I will have to go to plastic foundation. the all plastic frames performed perfectly, but they don't "feel" as nice.
     
  17. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    PP:

    Since I am only half traditional, (wooden frames w/plastic foundation) I also had a couple of blowouts. This was mostly due to my own inexperience using my extractor. Now that I've gotton used to doing it, I've not had any more problems. I bought an established hive from an older gentleman last year 'cause he was getting too old to care for them. A couple of the supers had the one-piece plastic frames. I didn't like them a bit. I ended up scraping everything off them, doing crush and strain, and replacing them with wood/plastic.

    Just my 2 cents worth.
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I've got a few of those all plastic frames as well, mostly from the original nucs that I bought. I personally like the feel of wood and use plastic foundation (also known as being on the "dark side" :lol:)
    My one beef with the all plastic frames is that when I pry them to remove, they "flex" too much. Same thing when I'm holding them by the lugs and flip the frame to see the other side, they flex and rack a fair amount, and I always wonder if this is doing any damage to the brood on those frames. It doesn't appear to, but I guess I like the rigidity of wood.
     
  19. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Just an update here. (more like bragging I guess) I extracted the rest of the capped frames from my hive last weekend. The total for the year from my hive is now 181 pounds. Some amazing work by the girls. I hope they do all right through the winter, because I would hate to lose that queen.
     
  20. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Did you have a scale, or did you just assume that a certain size container equaled a certain weight? It sounds like you're doing very well and had a great year. :thumbsup: