requeen nasty colony

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by ronsin, May 28, 2013.

  1. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    going through one of my colonies <a real nasty lot> 2 days ago i discovered 2 newly charged q cells normally i would do a split . but have decided to requeen to improve temperament. <did tear down q cells>. not sure on bestway to do this. am worried that if i dispatch old queen and introduce new one that bees will produce more q cells and swarm anyway or should i cull old queen move hive a few feet away put new hive on old site to catch flying bees and introduce them to new queen <will they accept?> i realise thatother stock will also have to be requeened after making sure no queen cells are left in. would be grateful for any advice PS iasked advice a couple of weeks ago about detering badgers and went with suggestion of urine in bottle under hive stands i administered some vintage chateu ronsin 013 and hives remain badger free so far
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    ..... i administered some vintage chateu ronsin 013 and hives remain badger free so far. Turn on your spy camera and you'll undoubtedly see them wobbling around drunkenly under the hives, unable to find the entrance. :rolling:

    If you can, cage the queen for 7 days so that your hive won't have any eggs or larvae from which to rasie new queens. Then remove her from the hive and after a few hours (when they realize how much they miss their queen) introduce your new one by any one of the standard procedures. You could do this in combination with your idea of moving the hive and letting the field bees come "home" to discover a new queen. effctively splitting the hive and replacing both queens with purchased ones of good reputation.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    once the swarm impulse is set in motion they will swarm. Destroying queen cells is nothing I would ever recommend. I would split the hives wait until you have them balanced out with laying queens in both then requeen
     
  4. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Ef, I believe the only alcohol in this would've been from Ronsin's local pub from the night before (well filtered so to speak...).

    The aggressive behavior could be caused by continuous issues with the badgers. Re-queening might not sort out the problems with this hive.

    Can you raise the hive up higher to where the badger cannot reach it?
     
  5. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    ronsin,
    are these swarm cells? thinking along the lines of what riverrat said, they will swarm anyway, and tearing down the cells, they will just build more. if they are swarm cells i would do as riverrat said, divide, then requeen. you are 'strapped' with a bit of a problem on the badger thing though......having had bear problems (and to a lesser degree badgers), to paul's post, the girls can get awfully snarly until they are moved, or they abscond, or the problem has been resolved. (so you will have to keep applying the "vintage chateu ronsin 013"......:grin:
     
  6. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    i agree with what you say about swarm impulse but this hive is in an out apiary and not having spare equipment at hand rain forcast for the next few dayspulled q cells to gain bit more time think i will take your advise and do a split wearing plenty of armour thanks
     
  7. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    good stuff this chateu ronsin anyone interested in purchasing some let me know and i will let you know price and shipping costs <may become a millionaire yet? thanks for advice ef
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "good stuff this chateu ronsin anyone interested in purchasing some let me know and i will let you know price and shipping costs <may become a millionaire yet?"

    ......:lol:
    gotcha on buying some time.....wear some armour, use a smoker, divide, best wishes! :grin:
    oh and ps, post back !
     
  9. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    thanks for advise guys
     
  10. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    With a nasty colony, I don't like to be going through the colony surrounded by a cloud of angry bees bouncing off my veil. I prefer to move the colony to a fresh stand a few metres away and put an empty box (or one with 1 frame of stores plus 1 frame of eggs from a 'good' colony) on the old stand. After a few days, the old nasty colony will have lost a lot of foragers and guards and will be easier to inspect and sort out.

    I realise that personal and apiary conditions vary.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    with nasty hives finding the old queen and then dealing with queen cells can sometime be a pretty burdensome undertaking.. especially if you are working by yourself.

    normally if I was set upon dispatching the old queen I would pound and drive the entire hive thru an empty shell with a queen excluder nailed to the bottom. this almost assures me I will locate the queen if there is one and the more you pound the equipment the greater the possibility that in the process any and all queen cells have been destroyed.