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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was given an old extractor. It is looks like a modified 45 gallon drum with a hand crank and spots for 4 frames. It was stored outside for who knows how long and is slightly rusty. I am looking for a good paint to use on the inside surfaces. My though was to use an epoxy enamel paint for restoring cast iron tubs. Does anyone have a better idea?
 

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Take it apart, sandblast, wipe with alcohol soaked rag, then apply two coats of Cam Cote.
On the outside you may use hammered finish metal paint. Good luck:thumbsup:
 

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I gotta go with everyone else on the Cam Cote. Also, be sure to use a food grade lube (also sold by the bee supply companies) on the interior moving parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have phoned every bee store in the province, and looked extensively on line. Cam cote does not seem to be available in canada. Shipping form the states is quite expensive. Can anyone tell me if regular epoxy, or klenk's epoxy enamel is food safe?
 

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Can anyone tell me if regular epoxy, or klenk's epoxy enamel is food safe?
Information like that should be in the small print on the lable. You could also contact the company on the internet and ask them.
 

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Hi Pistolpete,

I have a similar problem: I need to restore a used extractor and don't know what kind of epoxy available here in Canada to use.
What was you solution?

Have a nice day,

Addam
 

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Addam--Welcome to the forum.:hi: You fitted your question in so naturally we almost didn't realize tht it was your first posting. Whereabouts in BIG Canada are you located? Could you already be extracting honey or are you one of those blessed people who think far ahead and get things ready well in advance?
 

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Hey Addam:
Welcome to the forum. Like Efmesch pointed out you almost snuck by us! :mrgreen:
You will find beekeeping to be very regional so narrowing down your location is very helpful to those hoping to answer any questions you may have.
Member Adam Foster Collins restored a galvanized extractor and converted it from a 4 frame tangential to a 9 frame radial. He used some kind of food grade epoxy and would know what's available in Canada. Send him a pm and he will respond to you.
 

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Hi Crofter, PerryBee, G3farms and everyone else,

Thank you all !

I started here in Rimouski (Quebec) last year with one beehave. The experience was good and the beekeeping world is so thrilling for me that I decided to go with more beehaves this year.

Last september, a beekeeper here in Rimouski have extracted the honey for me. This year, I bought an old 4 frame extractor and I'm plannign to restore it.

I have found some epoxy paint but it is not mentioned that it's a foodgrade paint (for example: http://en.unimat.ca/epoxy-paint.html or http://www.homehardware.ca/en/rec/i...ENK-BLANC-1L/_/N-ntlqx/No-48/R-I1710358?Num=0).

I am going to PM Adam Foster Collins, as suggested by PerryBee, to see what worked for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I ended up using the Klenk's bath tub enamel epoxy. However, I don't think I'd recommend it. I had a month to let it cure, and even after that amount of time there was a slight epoxy smell in the extractor when I stuck mu head right in. It did not transfer into the honey because the inside of the extractor gets immediately coated with honey, which effectively seals it. Also the honey only spends a few minutes in there. I'm confident it's food safe, but there has to be better stuff out there.
 

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Some of the epoxies can use up to 160 F to complete the best cure. This will also drive off any remaining volatiles. That said, some epoxies have a large measure of bisphenals which is what all the the alarm was about a few years ago on the drinking containers and can liner materials. "epoxy" is a generic name for some very different animals. I would not worry too much if honey is extracted and immediately out of the extractor which is then washed clean. Contact time is very short but if honey residue is left in there till the next usage it would have a lot more time to work on whatever might be soluble from the coating.
 
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