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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting to think about what to do with honey once we get some extracted. I had lots of people wanting to buy from me even though we've only harvested 1 deep frame so far. I really don't want to use plastic bottles, would much rather use glass. Where is the best place to buy jars from? Mason jars would be perfect because they can be reused easily either by me or the end customer. Anyone charge a "deposit" or offer a discount when a customer brings a good jar in for exchange? I can get pint and quart mason jars locally for $7.99 and $8.99 respectively and they're new with lids and bands. Ball does make a 12oz jar that would hold about a pound of honey but I haven't seen them sold locally but I haven't really looked for that size either.
 

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DLMKA, i buy the Golden Harvest glass Qt. & pt. fruit jars, they don't have writing on the back side ( the glass is slick) and it gives me a place to put my lables on, In Mo. if you sell retail honey you have to have your name, address, and weight of the honey on the container. States have different laws so you will have to check it out, if you sell from your home, the law is also different in most States. Like you, i like the glass jars and i knock off 30 cents if the customer brings back a clean jar(one of mine) for exchange. Jack
 

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If you sell in a store or consignment shop the rules can be quite differnt. Some states will do a "stop sale and hold" if an inspector walks through or someone tells them. That means they keep your honey and you may still be fined for processing food illegally. Food sold in licensed facilities usually has to be from licensed facilities.
Back door, roadside stands, and flea markets/farmers markets are usually good.
WalMart has mason jars too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't plan on selling in actual retail establishments. I'm thinking of putting a sign in the yard and word of mouth. If half the people actually buy honey that told me they will i'll have it all sold pretty easy. I just looked in the Dadant catalog and their containers seemed really high.
 

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You may find jars a little cheaper, how ever if you don't pick them up your self, freight will eat you up, glass in particular, it's heavy.
Just be sure and figure freight cost !

Murrell
 

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I was in the Dollar General Store today and a dozen quart jars were $8.99. The honey I've sold so far went for $15/quart and they wanted more than I had. So considering the price of jars, I guess that's fair.
 

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i use both, plastic and glass mason jars, and some specialty jars that fetch a higher price. the plastic jars i use are not bears, but very attractive and very clear with a bee embossed on them, customers like them, and i use a custom label that is tied on. i don't charge a 'deposit' for the mason jars, i just figure in the cost of these to the price. sometimes some customers will return these to me. for the most part i don't want them back or reuse them unless they are in perfect and pristine condition, no scratches...i don't offer a discount for the return of a glass jar they paid for...many times what i would get back is unacceptable to re-use for the majority of my customers. depends on who you are selling these to as well, and your personal methods. sometimes discounts can run you into an expectation by the customer, and you wind up paying for that expectation to please them. mason jars are inexpensive, having glass shipped to you is not. charging for your honey and your packaging is fair, irregardless of what it is packaged in.

you have to decide the costs of all of your labor, the honey, packaging etc. for your situation and go from there. my overall advice is don't sell yourself short when it comes to selling your honey.
 

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At our Alabama Beekeeper association spring picnic, Walter Kelley and Rossman delivered orders free of charge to the picnic. I stocked up on jars from Rossman and beat Wal Mart's price because I didn't pay tax or freight.
 

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...you have to decide the costs of all of your labor, the honey, packaging etc. for your situation and go from there. my overall advice is don't sell yourself short when it comes to selling your honey.
My grandson discovered an interesting point about human nature: Selling his honey for a premium price had his customers feeling that they were getting a better honey than the cheaper competition. I'm not saying his honey wasn't better [as his grandfather, any special praise I give to his honey would be subjective], just that people were very willing to pay a higher price, buying directly from the beekeeper, and felt they were getting their money's worth. :yahoo:
 

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:goodpost: <should be must read post.

a snip...
If half the people actually buy honey that told me they will i'll have it all sold pretty easy. I just looked in the Dadant catalog and their containers seemed really high.

tecumseh:
double the number and then your anticipated count will be about right. unnoticed by many a lot of containers are shipped with you caring the casualty if the glass arrives broken.
 

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tec:
"unnoticed by many a lot of containers are shipped with you caring the casualty if the glass arrives broken."
good point, you will have broken or cracked glass in a shipment, and these are not insured.

ef's post:
"My grandson discovered an interesting point about human nature: Selling his honey for a premium price had his customers feeling that they were getting a better honey than the cheaper competition." and "just that people were very willing to pay a higher price, buying directly from the beekeeper, and felt they were getting their money's worth."

an excellent post ef, as tec said. this is exactly how i sell my honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I can drive to Dadant to get glass containers and minimize the shipping costs and damage (at least if something breaks it's my own fault). Canning jars seem to be about the best solution. End user can reuse if they do any canning.

Looks like Golden Harvest is a brand name made by Ball but sold only by Walmart. I'll have to find something else because I don't shop at Walmart. Ever. For anything.
 

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Don't neglect screw top liquor bottles. Half pints are good Christmas gift size. Though my favorites are Jim Beam bottles. Ah, er, of course I pick up all mine at the recycling station... yeah, that's my story.
 
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