Rookie mistake, mixed signals and now have a question.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Lburou, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    ROOKIE MISTAKE: I had harvested a queen cell and hatched it in a small NUC. The (virgin looking) queen looked great but hadn't started laying yet. Nevertheless, I decided to mark her anyway. Long story short, she flew away. I stood there in 95 degree heat and sun for 15-20 minutes in case it would have helped her to navigate home. I shook a frame of bees to stimulate fanning and help her smell her way home. Well, its been five days and I don't see her or any eggs. Looked for her on three different days with no smoke.

    I added a frame of eggs and brood last night to see if they would start any queen cells. None yet, in fact the notched area has been partially repaired and the eggs removed -that suggests to me they could be queen right. Will a caged mail order queen in that hive keep them from making queen cells if they are queenless? They were not aggressive to a caged queen when I put her on top of the frames today. Mixed signals.

    ROOKIE QUESTION: How would you interpret rebuilding of the notched comb, egg removal and non-aggressive actions toward a caged queen?
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I wouldn't bother with notching the egg cells. The bees can do that for themselves if they need to make QCs. The bees would tear down/rebuild any notching job you did that doesn't meet their particular needs or liking- I wouldn't read too much into that.
    I think you didn't give them enough time- you put in the egg frame last night, and you're looked for QCs today, right? Leave them alone now for at least 2 more days. Then look for QCs. Be careful and gentle now when pulling any frames out for inspections- there may be QCs hanging down or projecting between frames, and they will be in a delicate stage of formation. I'd say if they don't show any QCs in two more days, then odds are you have a queen in there.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I think if you introduce a new queen, the mated but not laying queen will kill her and start laying in a week or so.
     
  4. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    That is the rub Iddee......Did she make it back after flying away? If she had made orientation or mating flights, no problem, she'll come back. IF not, its unlikely. Omie, I understand about the timing and the notching (vis-a-vis MDAsplitter) of queen cells, I just like to try new things.

    I'll give them more time with no caged queen to foul the works. Thanks for your words of wisdom. :)
     
  5. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I bet she is in there. ;)
     
  6. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    ​I hope so Omie! Its a mating NUC with nine half frame deeps, three still undrawn....She should be easy to find. :)
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :rolling: Don't be so sure :rolling: I went through 5 frame nucs today and found eggs and all, but just wanted to see the queens for myself before letting them go tomorrow.
    I'm guessing you know the rest of the story on 1 of those nucs. :lol:
    Went through it twice but missed her, too many bees in there. Weather not great for foraging so a lot of bees at home.
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Of all the queens I have ever had fly, every one has returned.
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Of all the queens I had fly, one took off into a blue norther and didn't return. Obviously I'm still new at this. but you know my queens have mated themselves and so on, mostly successful and I missed it all...
     
  10. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    We have queen cells! Will look in on them in about two weeks. :)
     
  11. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Well you are back in business! :D
     
  12. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    I have to admit that my too frequent inspections have caused the loss of two queens in that same week -one flying away and another just disappearing. I'm going to have to resist the impulse to know everything about the development of each cell and subsequent queen. :)
     
  13. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Patience Lee......the big tower hive started last year and had it's virgin queen fly away when I was putting it together.

    IMG_7423.jpg
     
  14. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

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    If you open a hive without smoke the bees could be nervous and accidently kill the queen. If you have a virgin or a new queen introduced in a colony it´s more risky to open the hive, even with smoke. So keep cool, and let the bees in Peace for a while. Even walking in front of the hive can kill a "new" queen, opening a hive causes robbing, which causes dead queen and so on... I´m not a Perone fan, but there are moments it´s better keep yourself far of the bees.
     
  15. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    I have never heard of this before- where are these pieces of information from?
     
  16. ORoedel

    ORoedel New Member

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    Our queen breeder corrects me after I told him (very proud) I open hives without smoke. Even small scutellata hives (on the right day). He explained me that the bees stressed (especially you requeened them) are "protecting to much" the queen and kill her. Or even are getting nervous with her, she isn´t laying at all, and kill her. So he tolds me better not walking in the apiary until the queens are fully accepted. I didn´t believed it and made tests. And it´s true, requeened colonies are very nervous. Walk in front of the hive, then put your ear on the hive, they are running and buzzing nervous up and down. Attacks you... If the queen is accepted and laying you can open the hive on the right days (beekeepers feel it) without smoke, BUT the queen breeder would never do this. I do, but if I see the bees will be nervous I close the hive and let them in Peace. If they are calm, I pull the brood frames and always find the queen. BUT on the right days! Not everyday. That´s why I use mostly smoke and sometimes (sugar/lemongrass/spearmint)water, too.