Rookie mistake number 102938475638201938.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Gator_56, May 19, 2013.

  1. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    So because I haven't made enough mistakes with my first hive I decided to try another one!!!

    A few weeks ago I checked the hive and we had a medium full of honey. Mrs. 56 asked if we could harvest and bottle it the next weekend. So I put the bee escape board on it right then so I would have it cleared of bees that following weekend. Well one thing after another piled up and we weren't able to harvest. I figured what the heck, I'd just leave the escape on the hive. About half way through the following week i realized we weren't going to be able harvest again so i took the escape off and let the bees back up there.

    That week and half was just enough time for the two or three SHBs that seem to always be in the hive to lay eggs and needless to say when we harvested today..... big surprise!

    Cost us about half a super..... live and learn I guess!!
     
  2. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Yup, they'll do that... anything over 3 days is too long to leave the escapes on... in fact I don't like escapes at all for just that very reason. I prefer to just shake the bees off. If you shake them over the hive the bees just fall back into the hive and crawl down without angry bees. I used to blow them out but doing that resulted in more angry bees and the younger bees that recently emerged wouldn't make it back into the hive.
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    The one time I used an escape board, I got back into the hive about 16 hours later and only had to contend with half a dozen bees. I usually don't even have the time to wait that long, only home for 1 to 1-1/2 days on the weekend, so I just pull one frame at a time and brush the bees off. Also, if you have an upper entrance and put an escape board on-you're setting yourself up for a robbing situation.
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Boy, am I glad we don't have SHB in Israel. It would really change the whole picture here. It's bad enough with varroa.
    If you want a quick, relatively quiet honey removal process, "Bee Go" and the likes are really effective. The first time I used it I found the smell to be very offensive (as obviously do the bees) and was afraid that it would taint the fragrance of the honey, but it didn't.
     
  5. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Never used an escape but have had good luck with the "Bee Go" or whatever the name is.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    gator, try a fume board and some fischer's bee quick.........:thumbsup:
     
  7. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I have a question concerning this issue. This was the top super that I harvested yesterday. Once I got through I froze all of the frames to kill any remaining larvae. I am concerned that the same problem may exist in the bottom super.

    Would be a good idea to remove that super and freeze it as is for 24 hours and then put it back on the hive?
     
  8. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    Anybody have any thoughts on this?
     
  9. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    oops gator, will try to answer best i can, i don't have shb problems, however if you are concerned about shb in the first super, it can't hurt to freeze it. is it a full super? and have you taken a look at it? sorry i can't be more helpful, someone else here can jump in on this to answer your question better than i can. :grin:
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Continuing along riverbee's thinking (I have no experience with SHB), if that second super is full, I would suggest trying to freeze the second super too---but for longer than 24 hours. It takes time for the super and the included honey to reach the freezing temps and you would want the SHB population to be frozen for 24 hours. Give the super "cooling time" and keep it in the freezer for 48 hours.