Rooting Hormone

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Walt B, Oct 31, 2009.

  1. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    My wife found information somewhere that says honey may be used as a rooting hormone.

    Wondered if anyone here has tried it?

    Before I had a chance to suggest it, she decided to root half of the rose cuttings she takes next month with regular rooting hormone and the other with honey and compare the results. (I knew after 38 years married to an engineer something would rub off.) :D

    I'll let you know how it turns out.

    Walt
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I never had heard that. Keep us posted on how it turns out.

    G3
     

  3. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Somehow, honey being antibacterial, it just doesn't sound right to me. But what do I know? I will be very interested in the results! Especially since I am too cheap to buy rooting hormone...
     
  4. SlickMick

    SlickMick New Member

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    It was in fact on a national gardening show over here last night.. just dip the end of the cutting in honey and stick it in the pot

    Also suggested was a bit of Vegemite disolved in water and the whole cutting immersed before planting.. so there you go.. up to date info from down under

    Mick
     
  5. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Mick,

    Thanks. :goodpost:

    I shall let my wife know.

    Since she has records of the rooting hormone strike rate with "Old Blush" and "Perle d'Or" roses, those are the ones she plans to use for the experiment. It'd be great if the honey turned out better than the rooting hormone. :D

    Walt
     
  6. SlickMick

    SlickMick New Member

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    Walt,

    The presenter demonstrated dipping just the bottom 1/8" of the cutting in the honey.

    Now if that turned out better than rooting compound then imagine what it would do to honey sales :yahoo:

    Your wife sounds like one organised lady.. keeping records of cutting strike!! WOW. I'm flat out remembering what kind of tomato I planted last week

    Mick
     
  7. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    It has started. My wife took cuttings of "Marie Pavier" and "Perle d'Or" and put them in the greenhouses.

    [​IMG]

    Well, one person's "greenhouse" is another person's "old plastic bottles". :D

    Walt
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    so, do tell about the bottoms of the plastic jars, what was done to the bottom of them?


    always looking for different ways for doing something easy.

    G3
     
  9. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Her "planters" are the bottom 1/3 of vinegar jugs with holes punched in the bottom for drainage and/or absorption (once they're in the rooting mixture, the water is put in the pan).

    The "greenhouses" are fairly sturdy containers that had some kind of treat for miniature horses. Friends gave us a bunch of them. I cut the bottoms off with a band saw, effectively making them clear cylinders with a lid. They get placed over the cuttings and the lid "regulates" the humidity and temperature. Over the years we've used just about any kind of clear bottle and jug.

    The same thing can be done with clear plastic bags, like the ones from Lowes, and a twist tie or rubber band.

    Walt
     
  10. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Walt
    Tell us what she has done. I assume these are rose cuttings? Is one cutting dipped in honey and the other in rooting hormone? If that is the case, I wonder if she should have done a cutting without any treatment. Good job of recycling!
     
  11. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    You're correct, if we were doing a DOE of sorts, a couple of controls without any rooting hormone would be in order. (I'm a little concerned about the yellowing of 2 of the covers, but since they're on the same rose...)

    She already has records of the strike rate of the Perle d'Or and Marie Pavie with rooting hormone, and she has records of fairly dismal cutting results without hormone. This little exercise is to check reports that honey may be used instead of rooting hormone.

    Mick mentioned that he saw honey used instead of rooting hormone on TV, but, alas, we have no "vegemite" to add to the recipe. :(

    The hope is that the strike rate will either be the same or better with the honey. If not, back to the rooting hormone. If it's the same or better, we'll probably start selling "miracle bee rooting enzyme" at $5 a vial. :D

    Walt
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Thanks Walt, to me it looked like something was wrapped around the bottom of the clear plastic jar. Need to adjust my glasses a little bit :p :p

    I will be curious to see haow this turns out.

    G3
     
  13. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Walt, Any news on the rooting hormone experiment?
     
  14. No_Bivy

    No_Bivy New Member

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    I think late spring is a better time to try and root things........lesat for trees it is. Clip the new growth and root that
     
  15. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    Thanks for asking. They seem to be doing OK. Haven't moved them from the initial containers yet.

    One of the honey cuttings died, but it was a little suspect in the beginning. When the weather warms up a bit will be the time to check for root growth and transplant them.

    We take cuttings of things like American Beautyberry and Vitex in the spring. Around here, best time for roses seems to be late October, November. Some will strike in the spring, but we've had better success in the fall. Not that we've done a lot of testing. Basically, the local rose nurseries root in the fall, so we figured, if it's good enough for the commercial growers... ;)

    Will let you know what happens when we have the "great rose root hunt".

    Walt