royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it???

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by barry42001, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    as you can see that there are fairly large larvae swimming in royal jelly, thought they stopped getting it around day three, switching to bee bread.
     

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  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    You are correct, and how old do you believe those larva are?
    To be exact workers and drones stop receiving royal jelly at day 3.
    Worker royal jelly is clear to light white and is from the hypopharyngeal glands..
    Queen royal jelly is actually a light white to light yellow since queen (true) royal jelly is actually a mixture of two glands in the nurse bees head. Queen royal jelly is 50-50 mandibular/hypopharyngeal glands. "57-kDa protein in royal jelly, (mandibular gland) previously designated as royalactin, induces the differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens."
     

  3. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    I would think that the largest of the larvae are atleast 3 day or older, but they are still swimming in royal jelly. I had no idea there were 2 classes of royal jelly thanks for that information, I presumed that switch to bee bread was the difference, but apparently even if they kept up on the royal jelly it would not be the right royal jelly cause them to develop into queens. fascinating .
    Barry
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    a barry snip...
    switching to bee bread

    tecumseh:
    this seems to be a term with various meaning depending on the audience. bee bread for me is the store pollen that is in a frame.

    for myself... any food stuff fed to larvae is larval food.

    there appear to be larvae of various ages in the picture. I would guess larvae are from 3 to 4 days old <just a guess for certain.

    thanks for the specific differences in larvae food Americanbeekeeper.
     
  5. 100 TD

    100 TD New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    Maybe off topic but, if you are grafting, especially in dry climates, is it worth trying to get a larva and it's jelly into a cell, and try to add some jelly from another cell (by flicking the larva from than cell and just transferring some extra jelly). I say this to getter a better graft rate due to dryness. Or is it better to just hope the bees will start feeding mandibular jelly straight away.
     
  6. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    You can use real royal jelly from queen cells (or Glorybee) or worker "royal jelly" or yogurt. The bees will remove all but true royal jelly. The second time you graft you should be fast enough. The Jamaicans I taught had a 50 percent success the first attempt. Most regular queen rearers dry graft. Miksa Honey Farms is an exception. They fill the cup before grafting.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Re: royal jelly, and what age do the larvae stop getting it?

    americasbeekeeper writes:
    They fill the cup before grafting.

    tecumseh:
    sometimes call priming the cell (queen cups).

    most time in the early part of the year I simply manipulate a hive in such a way to generate a small quantity of royal jelly and use this for my first graft or so. priming is a good practice for beginner to grafting since it will increase you acceptance and your confidence. eventually as americasbeekeeper suggest above you will likely go to dry grafting if you do this much at all.

    priming as described by Gary as done by the Miksa will give you a nice pretty long queen cell. it likely has little end effect of the quality of the queen.