running out of space while treating for mites

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Papakeith, Aug 18, 2012.

  1. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    Two weeks ago I treated my two colonies with Apiguard. The literature calls for two treatments two weeks apart. Today was the day for the second treatment. Now I have another two weeks before I can add the supers back on for the last nectar of the season.

    Both hives are strong. Both hives are made up of two deep hive bodies. The top hive body of each hive was packed pretty heavily before treatment, and the bottom hive body for each had stores and space for brood but neither was what I would call heavy.

    So here I am two weeks into treatment and I'm seeing the bees bringing in pollen by the truckloads. I've no doubt that they are filling up what little space was left to fill. A good thing to an extent, but I'm worried about too much of a good thing. In my minds eye I see them running out of space and swarming on me just before winter.

    I'm wondering what I can do to keep them from running out of packing space before the next two weeks are up. I was thinking of just pulling two frames of capped honey from the top hive bodies of each hive and letting them work some new frames. I could store the full frames until spring and give them back to the hive at that point. Or, if they don't use the frames in the next two weeks I could place them back in the hives when I re-super.

    thoughts?
     
  2. Dunkel

    Dunkel New Member

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    That sounds like a good plan. I may do the same with a couple of my hives tomorrow. I started treatment two weeks ago on 8 that had just finished drawing out and filling their second deep. I had the apiguard and it was cool enough. I am going to go with maqs on the productive hives in a couple of weeks. We are starting to see the early golden rod and a few asters but they are not working those yet.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Question for both of you.

    WHAT WAS YOUR MITE COUNT?

    If you didn't take any, you are spending money to damage your hives.
     
  4. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I did a sugar roll on both hives and got counts of 7 and 5.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Save your money. Treat when the count hits 20 to 30.
     
  6. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    At this point the money is spent and the treatment administered. What I'm looking to figure out now is whether or not I should be worried about hive running out of storage/brood space.
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Do what you mentioned.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Like Efemsch said, pull a few frames and replace them. Clearly mark the frames you pull though so that you don't inadvertently extract them at some later point.
     
  9. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    would it matter where I pull from; top or bottom hive body?
    Of course all of this is dependent upon what I find when I take a look later on today. If there is space I'll do nothing.

    Here's another thought. How about adding a third full 10 frame deep body? If they wanted they could start drawing out the comb and I could use it to give the colonies I start next year a head start. So many options or at least thoughts.

    But for now I'm off to go shoot some targets. A man's got to have his priorities :)
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    When I was busy last fall I put third deeps on a few just so I didn't have to watch them as closely. I would not be too concerned where you pull the frames from, just make sure it is capped but that you leave enough. Place your empty frames of foundation or even better, comb in your top deep.
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If the girls don't have enough business coming in to build, they will often nibble away at wax foundation. Make sure to check those "extra" frames from time to time so they don't get ruined. [If you work with plastic foundation, this is no issue].
     
  12. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Concerning giving them another new undrawn deep at this point:
    One problem with giving bees lots of new undrawn frames at this late in the season (especially since you do not live in the warm southern US) is that late Summer/early Fall is not a time when bees normally are in comb building mode. They may work on some of the frames if you give them a new undrawn deep now, but more likely come late October you will have to remove that deep and it will have frames with partially drawn comb and lots of open cells with nectar, rather a PITA and a mess to store over the winter. Of course you could always hose out the nectar to store the frames, but why waste good nectar and all that bee labor? I don't think you will get the nice drawn comb you are hoping to get, I never have when I add empty boxes in late Summer. In the Spring you would have much better results from throwing on extra boxes for them to draw.
    At this time of year the bees are concentrating on storing food (nectar, honey, pollen)- they are using some of the areas that were formerly jam packed with brood in Spring for winter food storage now, and that's just what they do seasonally. The brood nest naturally moves up and down and expands and contracts with the seasons. They have settled into two deeps for their 'home' and should be fine. Disrupting the brood area too much by moving/swapping frames and boxes a lot can set them back from what they are trying to do to prepare for winter.

    The likelihood of them swarming this late in Summer is small, especially if they are delayed or recovering from the mite treatments you are applying. My 2 cents' worth of advice considering the situation right now, is to finish whatever treatment you've begun, not give them more empty frames or boxes, and to stop moving their brood frames or boxes around. I would check about a week after treatment is finished to make sure the queen is still laying (in case she was effected by the treatments), and then I'd leave the brood boxes alone to let them start preparing their brood boxes for winter. Wait til the miticides have worn off according to the label (which I'm sure you'd do anyway), and put your drawn honey supers back if you like, as you had planned. I'd leave the brood boxes alone now, after checking the on queen's health after treatment.
     
  13. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    . . . And lo, the bees lined up upon their frames. Looked skyward to their keeper did they. And they, as if of one mind, understood his concerns and worked to ease his worry. The words they conveyed carried not an ounce of uncertainty.

    And what words were spoke to the keeper intent on saving them?

    "Don't worry, we've got this". spake they.

    The keeper, their message received, retreated.
     
  14. Dunkel

    Dunkel New Member

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    Nope didn't do a mite count. But these were all I had that didn't have supers. I had a tub that was about to expire in Sept. so everything is going to get a shot till I run out. I waited too long last year and the temps got me.
     
  15. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    lol ! :lol: