Salt Drench

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by GrayGuy, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. GrayGuy

    GrayGuy New Member

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    I was reading an article “Keeping Bees in the Southâ€. The article had a section on SHB. One of the solutions was to drench the ground around the hives with a salt solution to kill the larvae as well as keeping grass and weeds down.
    Did a search on the forum and didn’t find any hits, so, was wondering if anyone here has tried this, and what were the results if any.
    https://kelleybees.com/blog/2012/04/keeping-bees-in-the-south/
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Salt will build up in the soil and kill most plants except for bermuda grass. It will not harm fire ants. Don't know what it will do to shb larva
     

  3. tommyt

    tommyt New Member

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    I was told that salt is the main ingredient in Round up
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would think anything (including roundup which is not benign to the bees) that you use to reduce organic stuff will give you some small advantage with the small hive beetle. I myself would put salt at the very bottom of the list of stuff I might use... it's is neither benign nor short lived in it's effect. you could obtain the same thing by giving the underside of the hive a healthy does of ammonia nitrate (which will essentially burn all the vegation).
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Don't know about salt? buying ammonia nitrate at the feed store is like pulling teeth. I'm dumping wood ashes (from my shop stove) under my hives, i know it contains lye because mom and grandma use to make lye soap from them.:thumbsup: This is an idea i got from Mama beek, has anyone heard from her in a while? Jack
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    couple of months ago I saw Mama Beek on here. If I didn't have pond liner under my hives I would try the wood stove ash. Presently putting it in the chickens run, they dust bath, no bug issues on them (such as lice, etc.).
     
  7. GrayGuy

    GrayGuy New Member

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    I posted a reply, but, it seems it got lost. Anyway you've given me a lot to consider. Thanks.
     
  8. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    We had the most success with the ashes...but we have to remember to refresh them from time to time. The salt concept is interesting but like the others I would fear what it will do the soil.

    Mistakenly we were told that shb do not exist in this part of MO.... now the battle has begun all over. Hopefully the winter will give us a leg up ;)
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    One thing about wood ashes i've noticed over the years, where you dump them the weeds and grass won't grow up through them after they get packed.:thumbsup: This could be a good thing for those of us with sbb's.Yes, mama beek we've had shb for about 4 yrs. now,myself i haven't had much of a problem with them. I keep my hives in direct sunlight and try to keep them strong. Good to hear from you mama beek,but sorry to hear about your problems, i just read your post. Jack
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    yep I would think wood ash would work real good. I know some hobby people that put down plastic or built a pea gravel base and they seem to not have that much shb problem. I have at least one yard on a sloping rock slab and I have almost no shb problem there either.
     
  11. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    I had had a small amount of SHB, but more than a dozen is too much for me to be comfortable. I did try two things, cement pads and sun but the cement pads would have had to be 100 ft long because the larva can crawl very far and very fast. The sunnier hives are better... Our next big plan is two fold, organic diatomaceous earth and chickens. The chickens are kicking up dust at the base of the hives, and the DE is both healthy for the chickens and kill larva. We shall see. Btw our honey bees were flying here in NC the past two days...feeding and foraging! Still four working...fingers crossed!