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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started my second year of bee keeping this year, and the weather has been better, but still no honey.

I live in Sapulpa, Ok just south of Tulsa.

I have heard of doing something, and wanted to put it out there for your thought.

What I have heard is you can split a hive in the spring, & feed it heavily. Then when they are are ready for another box remove the feeder & put a souper on instead of a second deep box. Let them fill up your boxes first. Then when you harvest you can a second deep, and start heavy feeding again. I just want some honey!

Thoughts?

By the way. I love the board. I have been reading for a few days, & decided to join. There is a lot of activity, from a lot of informed folks. Thanks.
 

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Are these hives overwintered hives? If they are strong when you split them you should be able to put on a second deep and still see some honey to harvest. Always err on the side of caution, if you take too much by adding the super first and then the deep afterwards, what happens if you get an early winter and the bees have not had the opportunity to build up?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They are overwintered hives. I understand what you are saying, & that is what I was skeptical about.

The guys that told me this said to harvest mid summer, then add your second deep & feed heavily. I can see where it can work, but I can see where it could lead to losing a hive to.
 

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Welcome Beeboy. Glad to have you join us. You should have a nice time here. :hi:
Keep your eyes open and enjoy Perry's wise advice and his sense of humor too.

Your proposal sounds very doable. Many keeps "squeeze" their hives for the honey and let them overwinter on syrup. Be careful not to let the syrup be available while they are collecting honey.
BUT, I'm sure you'll find many beekeepers who will tell you that the bees overwinter better on honey than on syrup. Try both options on different hives, compare your results and decide for yourself.:thumbsup:
 

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Welcome to the forum Beeboy :hi:

I am one of those that will say they over winter better on honey than syrup, but that is just me of course. Robbing them of some honey and making sure they have enough stores for the winter and spring is a tough call. I am like Perry and always err on the cautious side. Here they can make it through with a deep and a shallow, this past winter could have done it easily on just a deep. The trick is (just as anything ag related) is what will the weather do.
 

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Welcome B2! That will work.
To eliminate any confusion a deep super is a box, a medium super is a box, a shallow or Western super is a box. The lowest super or box regardless of depth may be called a hive body. It may not be a brood super by the end of winter since bees move the cluster up when cold. In the not so rare case the bottom super or hive body is honey-bound, it really is not a brood super then either.
super = box
deep, Western, medium (Illinois) or shallow = super
hive body = super
 

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Welcome Beeboy. I can't compare honey vs sugar syrup. I picked the absolute worst year to start beekeeping last year. The severe drought meant I fed from the time I hived the packages until it got too cold to feed. But they did well on the syrup. In fact they all did so well they all swarmed early this year. I guess I over fed :)
 

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a large HOWDY from central Texas.

what I suspect the person is describing to you is his system of obtaining something of a honey crop in your particular geographical area. you take a hive and split and then feed to expand the population so that by the time the main flow comes to you locality a large field force is in place to harvest the crop. you then take the surplus and make certain you feed something to get them thru the summer month and then maybe you get something of a fall flow to get the hive thru the winter. if the fall flow does not materialize then you are pretty much forced to feed some in the fall and continue this thru the winter months.

the primary economic idea being employed here is you are buying $.60/pound sugar and you are selling $5/pound honey.
 

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Welcome Beeboy,glad you found us :hi:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
a large HOWDY from central Texas.

what I suspect the person is describing to you is his system of obtaining something of a honey crop in your particular geographical area. you take a hive and split and then feed to expand the population so that by the time the main flow comes to you locality a large field force is in place to harvest the crop. you then take the surplus and make certain you feed something to get them thru the summer month and then maybe you get something of a fall flow to get the hive thru the winter. if the fall flow does not materialize then you are pretty much forced to feed some in the fall and continue this thru the winter months.

the primary economic idea being employed here is you are buying $.60/pound sugar and you are selling $5/pound honey.
This is exactly right. These are local guys that own hives all over the country. He even said that sometimes they lose more hives that way, but the reward is greater than the loss.

Thanks to everyone for making me feel welcome!
 
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