Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a hive I've had in my garage wall for about 6 years. I haven't raised bees in over 20 years but I'd like to try and remove this hive and hopefully save the hive in the wall into a 9 5/8s langsworth style box I just made. I did used to remove hives from walls and hollow trees years ago when I raised bees.
Plan number one is to put the box full of frames and foundation on the wall with a opening for the bees to enter and another opening going into a 2" hole in the the wall where the active hive is.
Do you think the queen will move into the new Langsworth [sp] style super or will I have to tear off a sheet of plywood to expose the hive and brood and move most all of it into blank frames with rubberbands?
Hopefully I can keep the hive in the wall and get a new one in the box I just made wait a while and do it again. I have done so with hollow trees years ago. They would make new queens.

Any help and suggestions will be appreciated BIGTIME.
Dakine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,249 Posts
Welcome to the forum Dakine:

I'm no expert (2nd year beek) but I doubt that the queen will come out if you're doing a trap-out. This is the first thread that I've read where the homeowner wants the in-the-wall colony to be a never ending cornucopia of bees, but I kind of like that idea.
Check out the older posts on this thread about trap-outs, put a cone of #8 hardware cloth with the big end over the entrance hole (making sure that all other entrances are closed off) and the small end on the entrance board of your Langstroth hive box. If you want to get every bit of comb, brod, etc-then a cut-out is the way you want to go. That, as the name implies-is removing parts of the building to get at the colony.
Either way you choose to di it, keep us posted. Pictures are great, and videos are even better.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
If you want to keep the hive in the wall and harvest bees from it, then a trapout is what I would do. Find a local beekeeper that you can get a queen from or a frame of brood w/eggs and proceed with a wire cone trapout but stop short of a complete removal. If you want the queen out of the wall you can use the Hogan style swarm trap but I have no working knowledge of this type. The other way is to do a cutout removal as you said and remove the drywall and install the comb and bees in your box(s).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the forum Dakine:

I'm no expert (2nd year beek) but I doubt that the queen will come out if you're doing a trap-out. This is the first thread that I've read where the homeowner wants the in-the-wall colony to be a never ending cornucopia of bees, but I kind of like that idea.
Check out the older posts on this thread about trap-outs, put a cone of #8 hardware cloth with the big end over the entrance hole (making sure that all other entrances are closed off) and the small end on the entrance board of your Langstroth hive box. If you want to get every bit of comb, brod, etc-then a cut-out is the way you want to go. That, as the name implies-is removing parts of the building to get at the colony.
Either way you choose to di it, keep us posted. Pictures are great, and videos are even better.
Good luck.
Year ago when I lived on Kauai and did bees I had a hollow stump in the jungle that over the year took numerous loads of bees out of. I cut the stump down to the top of the hive. Put a piece of plywood box size with a hole in it. Placed a box with a lid on top and drummed the bees [with hammer] up into the box. I then slid an excluder between the plywood and box and checked for the queen after awhile . If she was there I'd drum again and get the bees back up as some would have moved back down into the stump. I'd then slide another bottom in and take the box full of bees and queen. I'd then make the stump entrance smaller and wait a few months and do it all again!
Getting wild hives was the only way to get started bee keeping in Kauai back in those days.
Aloha Dakine guy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
instant giant observation hive. That would be interesting.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top