1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Making screen bottom boards has anyone used a different type of screen? No. 8 hardware cloth is so expensive compared to others.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    What's a Ssb? Sorry, just poking fun.
    Sbb's use #8 to allow mites through but bees can still walk on it. Cost can be prohibitive unless you buy a roll (50') :shock:
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Sorry PerryBee! I changed it. lol I guess I should have said has anyone found a screen comparable to no. 8 cloth at a lesser price.
     
  4. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Sure have...going to solid boards...
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Gotta say I'm with Dave on this. I have 15 brand new SBB that I built based on the Apinovar model that I have yet to use. It's been 3 years since I built them, and after having used the first 3 that I built I will probably sell the ones I haven't.
     
  6. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I paid ~ $85. for a 50' X 3' roll of #8 galvanized steel cloth. It is handy for robber screens and vents and double screen separators, moving tops and bottoms etc. I will use it to make slide in sifters to do mite counts but keeping the heat in the hive for spring, winter, and fall seems more important than the reported benefit of continuous screened bottoms. People in really hot environments might have different experience.
     
  7. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Bought a 50'x36" roll today for $106.00. I did the math. 50'=600", 600/20=30*2=60. This making the screens 20"x16-1/4". 16-1/4 *2= 32-1/2" So, the 36" roll cut at 20" then cut in half will get you 2 screens. This comes out about $1.80 per screen. Now, I bought 2- 1"x6"x12' pine. I was able to make 6 simple bottom boards. (Making them like the ones I bought) That comes out $2.33 per framed bottom board.
    Total cost is $4.13 per bottom board.

    With you guys that want solid bottoms. Especially for winter. I left a 1/2" slot in the back for a board or DIY sticky board.
     
  8. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    If i lived as far north as some of you i would probably go with solid bottoms, but in my area i have better luck with sbb's I don't have the bearding in hot weather like i did before and with the humidity here i don't have condensation problems in the winter using sbb's. Jack
     
  9. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Brooks, did you have a vent super, notched inner cover or vented candy board on the hives you have condensation issues with? I am thinking if I use solid bottoms, I am surely will be okay with with a vent in some fashion at the top. I can't help but to think about wild hive locations and lack where most do not have a large area of open ventilation the size of a screened bottom. And, they seem to do fine. I can understand why this topic is often debated.
     
  10. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I wonder how many in the wild get wiped out cause of varroa mites not having a place to fall away from the hive? Winters are getting milder here. I place boards under the sbb and use all-season inner covers. Insulated but have a 2"x3/8" opening to vent out.
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Dave, at that time i had the innercover (no notch) and telescoping cover. I have for years went with the migratory lid and two section top feeder (one side liquid the other dry pollen) the feeder has a 3/8 rim around the bottom with a 3/8 x 1" opening in the front for top entrance. I leave them on year round and out of 70+ hives i've only had one hive build honey comb in one.:thumbsup: This works great for me in this area, before i had SBB's and a top entrance on warm days i would have hundreds of bees bearding and fanning on the front, i don't have that now and my honey production went up. Our humidity is much different than other areas of the country,had people come to visit when the temp was in upper 90's and low 100 F that lived in coastal areas, they say how do you stand it:shock: we have temps higher than this back home, but it's not this bad. I guess i've got use to it over 74 yrs. now :grin:. Jack
     
  12. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    Well, got 6 bottom boards made tonight. Need to make 2 more to have 12 total. Want 12 hives 4 deep before spring. More stuff to build!
     
  13. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I am guessing fewer than we think. Take a look at a portion of this article http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm I have read many similar articles on the issue of small or natural comb being less favorable for the mite to exist because of literally being squeezed out. In all of my recent madness over keeping tbh's, I have came to appreciate the advantages of natural keeping and putting the bees before the honey, keeping bees vs. having bees. The more I read about the benefits of allowing the bees to build their own comb, the more I want to experiment with no foundation in my supers at least. I wonder if we rob the bees of their nature of adaptation and natural selection or building hardiness by doing too much for them? Sorry for rambling my fellow Hoosier but this whole topic has been a focus of my reading this winter.
     
  14. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Jack, I have to tell ya, 74 years of keeping experience simply humbles me. I wish I lived closer to more seasoned keeps like yourself. These discussions are why these forums are so valuable. I appreciate your input and my ears are open. It is so important to remain teachable.
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :rolling: If he's been keeping for 74 years, just how young was he when he started? :shock: Either that or as I suspect, he's as old as tec! :wink: :lol:
    (You know I'm funnin ya Jack).
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Dave made an honest mistake,:smile: you've been laying for me:grin:. Now your up again.:thumbsup: By the way shouldn't you be out shoveling Snow.:lol: Jack
     
  17. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Ha! You were talking about being used to the humidity for that long, not keeping, :rolling:....You know, it wouldn't be all that inconceivable though...If I am fortunate to live to 74, that would give me 34 years of keeping. And, if I were to have started at 5 years old, that would put me at 69 years....And yes, I should be shoveling a little snow off the walks and drive, but protesting it. We shovel and then it snows right back on top.