Seed people.....

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by BjornBee, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I made one last round to some farm markets that will be soon closing. I picked up some leftover pumpkins, some summer squash and some neck pumpkins. I love to roast pumpkin seeds for the kids.

    What are the chances these seeds will grow next year if I save some? I have heard that some seeds are programmed or treated to stop consumers from growing the seeds the next season, so they need to keep buying from the supplier.

    Then there are questions about growing true to variety, and whether a seed is a heirloom or not.

    The grower said they just buy plants or seeds every year, and stay away from using seeds from year to year, but basically this was from a cost versus hassle type thing.

    Anyone know much about this? Is it true you need a certain type seed from certain produce or they will not grow? I'm talking pumpkins.

    Comments?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I have a compost pile at the corner of my house. We bought two pumpkins and canned them in the fall of 2007. The seeds and peelings went in the compost pile. Last year, my back yard looked like this.

    [​IMG]

    This is one of about 15 I got from what started out as one vine, then re-rooted in the ground as it spread.


    [​IMG]
     

  3. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    Usually seeds harvested from fruits of hybrid plants will still grow and sometimes bear fruit sometimes not; sometimes the fruit will be true to the mother plant sometimes not. Seeds from GMO plants might grow but won't bear fruit. Seeds from heirlooms will grow and bear fruit true to the mother plant. (I hope that makes sense :roll: )
    We usually feed all kitchen scraps to our chickens and after they have been digested and composted we use them in the garden for mulch. All the time we have plants volunteering for us! Everything from pumpkins to tomatoes and peppers! So if you don't eat all the seeds it wouldn't hurt to experiment and let us know how it goes! :D
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    pumpkin seeds are only going to produce what ever they pollenated with, it could have been a pumpkin of the same variety to even some kind of squash. Only one way to know...........stick it in the dirt.

    I have had all sorts of things sprout and produce fruit that were just thrown over the fence. if you roast the seed don't plant it, it will not produce. The chances of growing something from the fruit you purchaed is very highly likely. A hybred fruit will tend to lose its vigor over a couple of years and revert back to its plain variety since it is a specific cross of two different varieties.

    The fruit has to go to maturity for the seed to be mature also.

    As far as heirloom seeds go in my book, they are just the old varieties that are not popular with todays standards. I was reading somewhere that there were at one time over 2,000 (if I am thinking right) varieties of apples in the US alone, now down to just a handful of the popular ones.

    Nice volunteer pumpkins you got Iddee, looks like some field pumpkins good for pies, my favorite, yummmmy.

    Bjorn also check on ebay for seed if you are trying to grow some of the giant ones, get the dills atlantic giant seed.

    G3
     
  5. Walt B

    Walt B New Member

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    A few years ago I noticed a vine in the garden that looked like cantelope. Since the garden was somewhat small, I asked my wife why she planted melons. She didn't. There was cantelope seeds in the compost pile and the birds did the rest...planted fertilized seeds.

    Each year we lived there we enjoyed cantelopes and never planted a one of them.

    Walt
     
  6. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    like Baby said, we got tons of volunteers every year. Most of the time they do better than all of the stuff we plant. We have a tomato that just popped up in the flower bed, it had to have been some kind of hybrid. The first year it was totally tasteless and only made a few tomatoes. This past summer was the third year and it produced very well, and they tasted much better so I'm assuming it's reverting to whatever the original type was....hopefully next year Baby Beek won't feed them all to her chickens!
     
  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    For what it's worth, roasted summer- and winter-squash seeds are just as good, if not better, than pumpkin! A word to the wise, however: DO NOT mix them in the roasting pan. Squash seeds roast up a lot faster than pumpkin. Don't ask me how I know this. :oops:

    I roast mine with cajun spice instead of salt. Mmmmmmm!