Self Medication in Animals(Mentions honeybees)

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by hlhart2001, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130411142716.htm

    Last two paragraphs:
    "The authors also note that the study of animal medication will have direct relevance for human food production. Disease problems in agricultural organisms can worsen when humans interfere with the ability of animals to medicate, they point out.

    For example, increases in parasitism and disease in honeybees can be linked to selection by beekeepers for reduced resin deposition by their bees. A reintroduction of such behavior in managed bee colonies would likely have great benefits for disease management, the authors say."

    So what "reduced resin deposition" and how does one "reintroduce such a behavior"?
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I'm assuming they mean propolis, and......................I dunno how. Maybe provide a drafty environment? :dontknow:
     

  3. Ray

    Ray Member

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    I believe the bottom line is: Darwin or may be 'laissez faire' as an husbandry practice.

    That wild animals are more likely to have a natural responses to disease and parasites.
    Therefor; we need to bring 'survival of the fittest' or 'non survival of the least fit' into our apiaries.

    snip:
    "according to Mark Hunter, a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] and at the School of Natural Resources and Environment."
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]My highlighting and [/FONT][FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]that[/FONT][FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] might say it all[/FONT]
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have some of the gluingest bees - they glue the lids down tightly with propolis,, lids, frames, seams, everything. But I found only one shb 2 days ago, no wax moths, and see no signs of varroa (cold front coming in and a queenless split, I didn't dig too deep)
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Man has severely altered the circumstances of many species; his actions are the ongoing source of what the animals have to cope with. The resulting evolution cannot be separate from mans artifacts. Like it or not we have become a major part of the evolutionary process. Sure dont have very good qualifications for the position, do we?

    Without our interference the bees might morph into something not much to our liking. Come to think of it, bees might have been a lot better off for their own interests if they didn't make such a surplus of honey.
     
  6. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I have subsribed this thought from the beginning...minimalism is better in my honest opinion.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    My wife (in one of her classes) in explaining evolutionary biology often speaks of approximate and ultimate outcomes. Man make all kinds of choice/decision and has a pretty good grasp of what will happen in the approximate time frame but often time is pretty clue less of the ultimate consequence of his actions.

    and yes I think the thing they are talking about here is propolis and it has been some years ago but yes at one time a breeding program was started to select bees based on minimal propolis disposition. I myself thought the idea was pretty silly 40 years ago but the most recent history of the honey bee suggest to me that this idea was down right stupid.