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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently, I was doing a door-step sale of honey. The customer (a Pakistani ?) asked if I also had any comb with dead larvae for sale. I have never been asked for this before and couldn't help. Communication was difficult and I was slow off the mark. Does anyone know about selling this and what it was for ?

Am I missing some lucrative new market ? I keep thinking about those frames of drone larvae that are removed as part of varroa control. I am sure The Boss will allow me to put some blocks of comb containing drone larvae in her freezer.
 

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Some cultures eat bee larvae (like a high protein sweet rice, it's considered a delicacy), but I'd think they want the larvae to be very fresh. Or maybe he thinks he could get your dead larvae comb cheap and feed it to chickens? It's a very nutritious snack for poultry.
 

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ABJ ran a traveling story about beekeepers. In Asia they do indeed eat the brood in a rotted or semi-rotted state. It is usually crushed in the comb from Apis cerana with honey. It was described as most pungent but a delicacy in the area, since it does not store well. The practice is more common in Korea, China, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam. India, Pakistan and Bangladesh do not eat brood for religious reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yummy Yummy. Delicious !

Makes a change from fried black pudding. Gary has that to look forward to.
 

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Fried black pudding. Had to look that one up. According to Wikipedia, it's something I ain't gonna try.

Tried blood sausage (didn't know what it was at the time) when I was stationed in Germany years ago. Just the one time. :mrgreen:

Same with ripe bee larva.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I genuinely like black pudding either boiled or fried. I was going to suggest Gary asks the locals about it when he goes to the Molesworth pub. He could also ask about tripe. It might be a good way to break the ice. Suggest no one tells him about what they are ---- it will spoil the surprise.
 

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I can imagine. They have put numerous things in front of me on my world travels. Ever tried kagogi or balut?
 

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One day on msn last year I saw an article about casu marzu (maggot cheese). I think I'd rather have the dead bee larvae.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kimchi..... I think I would try.

Balut (egg) ...... If you have tried it you have my admiration.

Kagogi ........ Sorry, couldn't find it on Wikipedia. Do I really want to know what it is ??
 

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I'm glad I am not a world traveler, could not pack enough food to keep me alive If I had to eat all of that kind of crap. I am just a simple kind of feller for sure.
 

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G3farms said:
I'm glad I am not a world traveler, could not pack enough food to keep me alive If I had to eat all of that kind of crap. I am just a simple kind of feller for sure.
:thumbsup: :thumbsup:
What about some exoticly smoked bacon and tenderloin ;) ;)
 

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Iddee, are talking 'bout "boudin"? I've been on the lookout for some pig's blood to try and make some.

I had a taste of Balut (an egg cooked w/ a not-totally-but-pretty-well-developed chick/duck inside) when I was in the Philippines. A guy would push a cart down the street in the morning yelling "Balut, Balut"; you just went out a got a few. I had a taste (my father-in-law was offering), but I did not finish. I'm a pretty adventurous eater, and as far I can remember, that's the only food I haven't been able to stomach.

-Dan
 

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Yep, We called it blood and rice pudding here when I was growing up. In the New Orleans area they pronounce it boo-dah, but spell it boudin.
 
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