Seven things you must know before becoming a beekeeper

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Charles, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. Murrell

    Murrell New Member

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    Sometimes taking the advise of experienced beekeepers really is helpful for Newbees especialy info. on what not to do.

    SgtMaj;
    How about telling all these fine folks here about your beginning Bee Keeping experiences this winter/spring, some here may not of heard !

    Murrell
     
  2. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    You mean last fall...

    Well here's what happened... after driving about 10 to 12 hours round-trip to pick up the bees, I got back home absolutely exhausted and went straight to bed without opening up the hive. The next day it was already 11 or 12 by the time I woke up and the bees had been out in the hot morning sun. Add to that that I didn't have my veil or gloves yet (they were supposed to have been delivered that same morning), and I was afraid to open them up without them given that they were likely going to come rolling out, so I put them in the shade and waited for my delivery, but by the time the UPS driver came, the bees had already overheated and died. So much for my first attempt at beekeeping.
     

  3. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Education is expensive. And can be hard on the bees too.

    I know a guy who brought a van load of packages north from GA who killed all of them from the heat. It happens.
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I know threads are for replies, questions, comments, etc. And some threads are posted as "thumb tacks" as a general type thread to pass along information from an educational angle. I say that, due to this thread starting as a information type thread, then seems to have a bunch of thrown in debate. Not really arguments, but perhaps not in the best interest of the thread for a "beginner". So many different advice given, that someone thinking of getting into bees (The thread seems to indicate items needed PRIOR to starting) may be just more confused AFTER reading the last three pages.

    I think that there is a place for topics that list "solid" type lists, information, and items to pass along that are a given in the bee industry. Just not really sure if the intentions of a new person seeking knowledge to get started, was fully fullfuilled by this thread and the intended purposes.

    Just another random thought..... :dontknow:
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Not sure exactly what you mean, but as moderator, you can start another thread and move individual posts into it. If you feel that's what it needs, do it.
     
  6. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Of course you don't! Nobody else usually does either....... :Dancing:


    tenjoooberrymudds.... :rolling:
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    So show me..... Break it up as needed. ;) :dontknow:
     
  8. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    I disagree, going back through the thread I still come up with a pretty good idea of what the absolute beginner beekeeper would need to know to get started. I would leave it as is, there are some good tips thrown in that may not be for the beginner but would work well for the first year beek.

    The hardest part of having an "informational" type thread is that what may be difficult for one person is not difficult at all for another. Take the frames for example, I called out a $350 startup cost as a minimum including woodenware, Tec talks about buying frames in the hundreds because they'll get used and you'll save $$ and SgtMaj say's don't buy anything you can just build it...Confusing? Not really, the person reading the thread now has 3 options and they can pick the one that works best for them based on their abilities and budget...

    My .02
     
  9. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I guess this, like everything in beekeeping, comes down to nobody agreeing on anything...... :Dancing:

    I think my point that I was trying to make, that is if you have threads designed specifically towards new beekeepers, or perhaps those seeking out info to get started, etc., that having a thread relay straight forward information may be something to consider.

    If I was a new person and stumbled upon this site, I would read this thread and quickly realize that beekeepers do not agree on where to stand, how much it takes to get started, nobody has ever built a honey house large enough, and a host of other confusing points.

    I'll use a beginner point you see on many lists designed to help a new person. One of the points on the list may be.... "getting bees", then it continues with info such as...... swarm capture, buying packages, buying nucs, buying established colonies, etc. It may even include some details or pros and cons of each. But what it does not do, is have a ongoing exchange and debate on each and every point. That is left for the main forum. The "sticky" thread is for general information and to give straightfoward info that the beekeeper or casual reader can then take and explore. This thread just evolved into each point being countered, and much of the discussion, is not even on topic. I question whether the reader intially going into finding "7 things you must know" really comes away with that.

    I think a forum can be much more than a place to chat. A thread can be "informational only". A closed thread such as a list of beekeeping terms, highlights on the different types of hives (Of course non-biased), general disease information, and anything else that could be beneficial, could enhance the forum. I do not think these type closed threads take away from the site. It adds to the site from the angle that beekeepers know a place where they can come and see such information when they need it. But I think they are best when they stay nuetral, and do not allow further discussion to evolve the thread into a ongoing rambling of things that the thread never intended.

    Having a thread explaining what each disease is may be helpful. An ongoing discussion with many different viewpoits on what to do may take away from the thread. But someone starting a new thread with "I was looking at the "recognizing disease" thread, and I now think I have chalkbrood, so I wanted to ask some questions about it.

    Just some more late day ramblings.. :drinks:
     
  10. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    I get what your saying now, took a minute to sink in :) There should be a line between the informational post and the general discussion posts. When looked at from that point of view I can see the benefit in not having to page through a huge discussion before seeing the answer, probably make it appear like we actually know what we're doing too ;)

    What I think I'll do is un-sticky this later (after all have had their say) and use the info in it to create a new informational sticky that's locked. then let this one float to the bottom...

    I could take suggestions via PM to update it and keep it current. Good idea?

    All a part of the admin learning curve :mrgreen:

    Thanks for pointing it out Bjoirn!
     
  11. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Charles, that was the point I was trying to make.

    I probably could of just detailed it out right up front, but it's that journey of the discussion that makes it all worth while..... :thumbsup:
     
  12. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Ain't it the truth :to_keep_order:
     
  13. SamTHorn

    SamTHorn New Member

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    This is perfect. Its exactly what I was looking for.

    Thanks for sharing

    ~Sam
     
  14. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Glad it helped Sam, and welcome to the board :)
     
  15. JordanRHughes

    JordanRHughes New Member

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    This is what I needed. Thanks for taking the time to post these tips.
     
  16. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Your Welcome Jordan, welcome to the board :drinks:
     
  17. KoryLGriffin

    KoryLGriffin New Member

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    Great tips and resources. This is exactly what I needed. Thanks again.

    Cheers.
     
  18. discover-beekeeping

    discover-beekeeping New Member

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    Hi - as a neewbie I found this a very informative post. Thank you so much
     
  19. fatbeeman

    fatbeeman New Member

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    spending $350.00 and up. well if you do it right you could get a free swarm of bees from a tree. make your boxes from recyled wood left over paint. no viel just use a old onion sack over head use a cigar for smoke.find old cement blocks to put hive on.=======now that a hive on the cheap.
    Don
     
  20. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp New Member

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    Well, after reading the thread it has some good tips in it. BjornBee suggested stating different points and then expanding some on each point to explain the points to the new beekeeper. I don't disagree with that idea, but shouldn't a new beekeeper do a little studying outside of the forum environment? For a "Seven things..." type of read I would suggest a new beekeeper acquire a book that has been in print and revised numerous times since 1917, Dadant's "First Lessons In Beekeeping". I read an *old* version, then a 1990 C.P. Dadant version, and I'm finishing up the last one printed in 2007 and written by Keith Delaplane. Excellent sources for a newbee (like me). I must say that Delaplane's version includes some excellent glossy color pics and the usual great information of "First Lessons". The latest version carries us all the way up to small hive beetles. Naturally, this small book can't cover everything, and it doesn't try to, but it seems to lay the basics out there pretty good...and it doesn't cost a fortune. ;)

    Ed