Seven things you must know before becoming a beekeeper

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Charles, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. RachelHaygoodNC

    RachelHaygoodNC New Member

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    This was helpful-thank you, Charles.
     
  2. bee stung

    bee stung New Member

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    #1 ,,, sooner or later you will get stung

    #2 ,,, sooner or later you will get stung a lot

    #3,,,
    sooner or later you will get the crap stung out of you

    #4 ,,
    sooner or later you will get stung were you never thought they could get

    #5 ,,,
    sooner or later you will wounder why you thought having stinging insects would be so great

    #6 ,,,,
    sooner or later you will wonder who would be dumb enough to take these stinging insects off your hands

    #7 ,,,
    sooner or later you will realize that like it or not you have a obsession for these stinging insects and want MORE





     

  3. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    I have finally read this thread , saw it but never looked at it.

    I think the $350 mark is a fair number, as anyone who is scared of that number, should be careful getting into this hobby.
    yes it can be done cheaper with a hive or maybe two, but it will be on a shoestring always.

    I like all the different suggestions made, as some are now obvious 2 years in, but would have not been originally.

    Consolidation of the ideas also makes sense ( if not already done)
     
  4. Youngbeekeeper14

    Youngbeekeeper14 New Member

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    I got my starter kit containing 2 hives, 2 spinners, tools and clothing all in reasonable condition for£50 from a retired beekeeper
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You got a good deal
     
  6. becsbeehive

    becsbeehive New Member

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    Thanks, I've saved this for a read later, been looking for things to switch up my beginner course material a bit.
     
  7. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf New Member

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    well I personally loved the camera idea (for a noob) because I can look at it while holding a book to check if nythings wrong --or send the picture to a mentor/friend that will know at a glance what ive been looing at for an hour wondering :) ---this afterall under the (befor becoming a beekeeper section) --as opposed to the expert area ????? ----just my thoughts on it anyways :)
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It is always good to go back over the basics between fall and spring... and yes, a camera can catch many things. Unfortunately my cell phone camera is impossible to operate in bee gloves but I have an old Olympus waterproof that has a nice button for micro shots and I use it to shoot pics of brood, bees, anything I find odd. Its buttons stick out so I can wear gloves while photographing
     
  9. brockmole21

    brockmole21 New Member

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    This thread would be a really great push for me to start in this field. Thanks for sharing the info.
     
  10. Sour Kraut

    Sour Kraut Member

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    I It's hot sweaty, hard work. Afterwards you will ache in places you didn't know existed. And be dehydrated as you sweated out a gallon or more. Tylenol or Ibuprofen will become your best buddy.

    II Yes, you will get stung. A lot at first until you learn all the tricks of 'suiting up' and how to light a smoker so it stays lit.

    III You WILL kill some bees each time you open a hive. Many at first, fewer as you learn how to do it right.

    IV You will NOT harvest 'great gobs of honey' the first year. Your goal in Year One is to get them built up for Year Two.

    V Finally (for now) prepared for Year Two in October or November of Year One. Tell all your family that ' I sure could use (insert item here) instead of the usual Christmas present.'
     
  11. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    who ever came up with that $350.00 amount needs to add inflation big time to that amount..lol..especially now a nuc can run from $175.00 up to $225.00 or more depending on where you buy from...
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    You aren't kidding on that. I spent $1000 on bees, equipment, suit, etc the first year. and another $1000 on privacy fencing to keep my neighbors and bees separate
     
  13. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    im still spending..lol...it becomes habit forming to keep buying new stuff and to expand the hives and related equipment...I coulda bought a ton of honey already for what was spent..but wouldnt of had the fun and ups and downs of beekeeping..
     
  14. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm still spending too, but I tend to bulk buy woodware to keep the shipping down, so I spent this spring and shouldn't need much besides beetle trap cloths to get me through next spring.
     
  15. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    most of the places I buy have free shipping if you spend over $99.00. I have compared prices to the places you pay for shipping and it still comes out cheaper with the free shipping..when I get motivated, I want to build my own hive boxes, I can get the wood cheap from the amish upstate and figure its about $4.00 of wood per box and do it assembly line and make like 20 boxes at a time, so setting up the table saw once for each different cut I need and not have to constantly go back and forth with adjustments..
     
  16. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I want to keep my fingers, and I have them in so m any pies that I am probably never cutting my own woodware and doing these dados. I have an antique table saw without a single safety feature on it, except the switch, I think that counts. It's in a shed with no room to work. I probably should see if I can sell it on ebay and remove the temptation
     
  17. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    after thinking a bit and talking to a true wood worker, im going to use a router to make all the rabbet joints for nail and gluing and a circular saw and square for cutting the pieces of the long board, much safer that way and less messing around adjusting the dado blades..
     
  18. Sour Kraut

    Sour Kraut Member

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    Find a good used Radial Arm Saw

    you can pick up a good used Sears (the earlier the better) for 300 or less, and a good crosscut blade + a good dado set will run less than another 100.

    It will do do both the cross cuts and dado's easily.....AFTER you spend the time to make sure it is set up properly:

    1) table flat (equidistant from the arm everywhere)
    2) all 'slop' out of arm angle adjustment
    3) arm at 90 degree mark = arm at 90 degrees from rip fence
    4) blade at right angle to table (never had to adjust this in 40 years on mine)
    Later you will want to build a table extension out each side to enable you to rip a full sheet of plywood.

    I'm not saying you can do EVERYTHING with the R.A. that you can do with a table saw, in fact I'm on a Quest For An Old Craftsman Cast-Iron Construction Built-Like-A-Tank Table Saw right now....the two compliment each other.
     
  19. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    I actually have one.LOL..its been stored under my work bench for years and I have a bunch of dado blades..a combo of lazyness and hip and knee surgeries for almost a year has prevented from alot of heavy work for me, but this winter I should be good to go..hopefully...do you have any plans you work from or just look them up online for the standard bee hive box for 10 frames? I cane reverse copy the boxes I buy, just minus the dove tails for connecting the corners, I figure gorilla glue and a brad or finish nailer will do the trick..I also have an old cast table saw, probably 2 buried in my shop, im sort of a tool hound, I end up buying out old shops for a set price and you get everything pretty cheap, I did that for a machinist too and got tons of equipment and accessories...I just figured the router was light and I could handle that till healed up ...
     
  20. Sour Kraut

    Sour Kraut Member

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    I've got boxes going on 4 years with nothing but pre-drilled / countersunk wood screws holding them together
     

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