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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, My name is Heidi Wolff and I have been keeping bees for about 12 years. I manage the Bee Lab at the George Washington University and make poorly edited instructional videos on beekeeping. My friend Eddy Honey recommended that I post these pics on this forum to see if anyone has ideas. I am hoping that it is not AFB. Since it is in an observation hive, it is difficult to open it up, and I have not done the 'thread test' yet. I hope to do that when I can take the hive outside, weather permitting. Any ideas?
 

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Welcome Heidi. You won't find a friendlier bunch of beeks!

Are the blue circles showing us something? The one circle is right over a larvae.

Thnks,
Ed
 

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I don't see what you are seeing. It's hard enuf when not holding the top bar in ones hands w/ the sun shining over ones shoulder across the comb surface.

How are the cappings? Are they healthy looking or are they sunken w/ somewhat an oily sheen to them?
 

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this likely should have been posted in another section.

not so great pictures... but I will give it a go anyway. pictures 3, 4 and 5 uncapped larvae at the center of picture look like they are melting. best guess would be european foul brood (perhaps the newer 'snot' brood) or perhaps some dietary deficiency. american foul brood happens at just a bit later stage of development.

is the observation hive in a heated or unheated space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I see I should have put this post in the pest/pathogen section and not the intro section, but I am new to this forum, so I suppose it is ok!

The blue circles are dry erase marker to note where I see abnormalities.

And the cappings seem to be pretty good, but some are looking suspect. Getting a little sunken and some look torn or with holes. But, the evidence is very slight, since this is a very new problem. There is no oily sheen to them though. The larvae look pretty gross however. I am sorry that the photo quality is not the best!

I see I got a reply as I was typing this
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, the photo quality is pretty bad, sorry about that! I took them with my phone, as my camera was not in the lab with me.

The hive is in a heated space, in a lab/classroom.

I thought that EFB had a more twisted and discolored look, whereas AFB was the melting symptoms?

The next post I make will be in the correct section, I didn't know what I was doing yet! I just registered today :)
 

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Yes, characteristically EFB is an offwhite sorta yellow looking mass twisted and laying across the cell. I have seen only a cpl of examples of EFB in the last 30 years. I believe, for some reason, EFB is more prevelant in MD than in NY.

THe trouble I think is looking thru glass, not the photo quality. Could be my eyes too, since tecumseh says he saw what you described. I'll look again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No chalkbrood, it was definitely gooshy and not mummified.

I will try to get better images tomorrow when I come back with my real camera. Or maybe I will make a video. Thank you so much for your help!
 

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Welcome to our friendly forum. :hi:

I have never seen a case of EFB but have seen 1 case of AFB.
EFB is treatable whereas AFB is not (well, actually some folks claim you can by putting the bees on new foundation and treating with Oxytet or Teramyacin, but those only "mask" the disease). A match is the safest form of treatment. :cry:
The "rope" test is the only way I can distinguish between the two, not enough experience to visually see the difference.
 

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man you guys are good... thank barbarian and americabeekeeper for the links..

you can see a good deal of EFB here and national data suggest AFB is fairly rare. a lot of folks (including myself) think there is a nutritional link for EFB.

since the hive in question is an observation hive placed in a heated enclosed area I wondered if something else wasn't happening here that was not disease related? I have never had that much experience with observation hive but I do know that they can be somewhat delicate.

sqkcrk writes:
Is that a Chalk Brood Mummy in the third photo?

tecumseh:
I had wondered if that could be a possibility..... I am not certain what the early onset of chalk looks like.
 

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I spent some time at GW, in the Theatre Arts program GW Workshops for the Carreers in the Arts, when I was in High School, 1969/70. These workshops later became the Arts Centered High School in DC. That's where I got my first whiff of Tear Gas, another story.

So, even though I don't know where on Campus this observation hive is, I can tell you it is in downtown DC. NE DC, I believe. This is where, near where, President Reagan was taken to Hospital when he was shot.

Being in such an environment may have something to do w/ what is going on in this observation hive.

What can this colony forage on naturally? Trees, I imagine. There sure aren't any fields of flowers around there. It's quite a ways to The Mall. I don't know if The Mall has any clover on it or not. It's been too long since I walked on The Mall. How far would thjey have to fly to get to the cherry blossoms, when they are in bloom?

I guess there could be flower boxes or some sparce number of backyard flower beds.

It would be interesting, perhaps, to find out what they do forage on. How far they go to find food. Where they find it and what it is. I guess all this is true for the hive(s) at the White House and on DC beekeepers roof in Georgetown.

Do you find need to provide feed very much of the year for this Observation Hive? Where is it, exactly? What do you use it for? How did it happen to get set up at GW?
 

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I'm think Heidi has several full colonies on the roof of this building that are thriving. If you go to youtube and search "urbangreenbee" there are many videos. So I'd assume if they are thriving then the observation hive should have adequate forage as well. When she logs on she can tell us how many colonies.
 

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welcome aboard glad to have you. If you would like I can move this to the general beekeeping section. However I see it has had a lot of replies posted here. Let me know if you want it done and we will do it. Again welcome to the forum
 
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