Since we haven't managed to keep any other honeybee pest out

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by barry42001, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    I believe is only a matter of time probably less time then, more time, before the Japanese Giant Hornet, or a slightly smaller cousin the giant asian hornet ( currently eating it's way through France ), finds it's way here. Are we actually prepared to deal with it should they become established here. How would you as commercial beekeerpers deal with something that required only 30 attackers to totally depolulate a colony of bees in less then 2 hours? You could come back to your yard and find half or less the number of live colonies you left behind. What can we as beekeepers do really do. It worries me a bit as one can treat for mites, though after the fact, and never truely get rid of them but atleast have something to work with ( live bees ). With these thingts there will be nothing to rebuild. Mind you, hasn't happened yet--but in all probability will in the near future. :beg: I hope not, but believe it will.
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Have they not tried putting hives inside mesh cages that allow honeybees to pass through to the hive but has mesh too small for the hornets to pass through? That way the hornets could not have access to the hive or the hive entrance. They might pick off bees on the mesh outside but they'd never get to the actual hive.
    Just thinking of possible things.
     

  3. rast

    rast New Member

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    Yep Barry42001, and we will probably get them here in Fl. first (and be blamed for them too :roll: ).
    Perhaps an entrance guard of some sort would work Omie. Work on that for us. OK :) ?
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    (speaking of past events) no matter what the threat there seems to first ALWAYS be a bit of overreaction by beekeepers, the fear then produces a bunch of snake oil salesman and finally when reality sets in (and a few beekeepers pockets have been fleeced) beekeepers resolve to work around the new threat. it kind of like the essence of darwinian evolution where some die and go extinct and somethings evolve themselves to the new situation.

    real beekeepers have been (and I suspect will continue to be) quite able to adapt to the new reality.

    ps... I think I understand what Barry is saying (above) but I would suggest that for a very, very long time we did indeed limit the introduction of various unwanted and exotic nasties from around the world. so the first thing someone should ask is 'what changed' that almost like a flood gate this or that nasty which was kept at bay for 50 years suddenly appears on the scene here?
     
  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    Might I suggest that since we have become a " Global Village ", and laxed inspection services to faculitate the flow of commerce through the already over extended ports of USA, many things have been introduced and many more will no if's ands or but's about it. Tec, how do you adapt to something like these hornets, combined with all the other wonderful news associated with beekeeping--mind you still will keep bees irregardless, and will attempt to perserve as will most of us.
    Barry
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I think 1/4 inch wire mesh over the entrance will keep them out.

    A few small strips of poisoned meat or fish laying around will finish them off.
     
  7. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    I think that if we are diligent in our beekeeping then the bees will be able to adapt and fend for themselves just fine. Just like a strong colony will defend itself against other pests (such as shb and wax moth) like their creator designed them to, they will adapt and learn how to defend themselves concerning these giant wasps.

    After all, there are still honey bees in Japan and Asia.

    There is an interesting snippet of information here: http://insects.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_insect_from_hell near the bottom of the page.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Barry writes:
    Tec, how do you adapt to something like these hornets, combined with all the other wonderful news associated with beekeeping--mind you still will keep bees irregardless, and will attempt to perserve as will most of us.

    tecumseh:
    might I say I agree with your previously described world view.

    there are places in the us of a where beekeepers have to attend to problems like predatory yellow jackets in large numbers. once a beekeeper recognizes the problem they might amend the problem much like in the manner that Iddee describes.
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I was reading somewhere that the Japanese beeks hire a couple of kids with badminton rackets to walk around in the bee yards to kill the hornets.

    That is how we kill the carpenter bees here at the house.

    G3
     
  10. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    How about just letting the kids get out the rat shot?? :eek: Sounds like a lot more fun than the badminton racket to me!
     
  11. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    actually there is a smaller shot, usually used to shoot small birds and not mess them up, called dust shot. and thats all it is lead dust not effective for but a short distance and should be adequite to shoot down the hornets--maybe :hunter:
     
  12. BeeSavers

    BeeSavers New Member

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    I'd get these guys to share how they built this. If they can shoot down mosquitoes the tech can be adapted to burn and shoot down hornets or even keep SHB from entering the hives. My own personal Star Wars laser defense system for bees.

    http://nyti.ms/aKcgm5
     
  13. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    That is a pretty wild little contraption to say the least. I think it would work great for zapping bee pest.

    Good post!

    G3
     
  14. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Wow that is cool, guess we'll have to wait for the desk top model ;-)
     
  15. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Welcome to the forum BeeSavers.

    G3
     
  16. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    That's my immediate thought, too. Hardware cloth.. possibly as large as #4 might be enough to block the hornets while allowing honey bees to pass through easily.
     
  17. BeeSavers

    BeeSavers New Member

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    Doesn't the Asian Hornet just hang outside the hive and catch bees coming in and out from the hive or do they invade the hive as well? That would make the hardware cloth moot if they just hung outside.
     
  18. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    2 different insects, the Giant Asian Hornet is as you described a bee predator securing adult bees, the Giant Japanese Hornet, even larger the the Asian Hornet, doesn't bother with adult bees, but wants the larvae more protien I would think. But thats the difference between the 2, both will decimate a colony in short order, both basically use the same technique, but Japanese Hornets actually enter the hive, the Asian Hornet doesn't until much later on. And believe it or not--honey isn't a consideration for either one. WHere's the beef--or in this case bee meat.
     
  19. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    The Japanese hornets, don't do much damage as a single attacker. Their main target in the brood. What they do, once a bee colony is found, is go back and recruit perhaps 20-30 sisters, then they attack in full force. In Japan, they pay young kids to walk around the apiaries with tennis rackets, and smack the crap out of any they find.
     
  20. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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