Single v Double Brood Chamber Q's

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by SuiGeneris, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I'm planning on ordering the frames/boxes for my first hive setup in early December, so that I have all winter to get them together (time is tight, so I'll need the extra time). Before I order I want to make sure that I've got things right, and my biggest worry is whether I should do single or double brood chamber hives.

    Most of the pros around here use single brood chamber setups, and that is also what is recommended by the apiary research program at the University of Guelph (located an hours drive away, roughly the same climate). There seems to be a lot of advantages for the new beekeeper - easier to find the queen, easier/quicker inspections, lower startup costs. Downside seems to be minimal; mainly a need in the fall to feed sooner and more vigorously once honey supers are removed, and feeding in the spring is pretty much a necessity.

    My concern though is that most of the articles I've read/videos I've watched are written to promote the use of single brood hives, and so I'm wondering if in their eagerness to promote them if something isn't being left out.

    thanks

    B
     
  2. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    28
    to start the hive I used a single brood box and as the queen layed and the number of bees increased I added another brood box so they dont over crowd and swarm away, also with 2 brood boxes I want to split the hive in the spring, so i will separate the 2 boxes and see which one the queen is in and either order a queen or let them requeen by putting a frame of fresh layed eggs for them to make queen cells( this is my way to try splitting)..most established hives in my area have 2 brood boxes and depending how fast they make honey several honey supers on top..
    in the beginning I would say a single brood box is best, easier for bees to defend against unwanted visitors( mites, beetles, robber bees etc.)..
     

  3. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Didn't think of doing a double-hive for easy splits...but that presumably something I can add alter. First year I'm hoping to simply muddle through with one hive.

    Thanks!

    B
     
  4. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    28
    that was my goal my first year, but I didnt think mites would be a problem, but it was and the hive did not make the winter, I sent the bees out for testing and the report was mites and then in a very weekend hive disease took over and it was done, so the next year I treated for mites using OA vapor and the bees made it through winter too good and swarmed in the spring, I had 2 brood chambers on but didnt think they would swarm, live and learn, they managed to requeen and the hive is very strong now, my plan is to treat for mites several times before winter as the OA vapor doesnt get mites in capped brood, and do a split of the 2 brood boxes in spring and put an empty brood box on each of the splits....
     
  5. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Mites are an issue around here, so I am quite concious about treating for them. One local bee keepers I know treats all of his hives once he pulls honey, whether or not large numbers of mites are present, so I think that's the route I will go.

    Bryan
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,887
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I have run double deeps in Texas, but the weight for me became an issue, I am trying to go down to mediums. In Canada I would say at least one deep, and I like Bob's idea of splitting by separating the deeps and finding the queen