Snake ID

Discussion in 'The Rural Life' started by Eddy Honey, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    IMG_3941.JPG

    I saved him from the chickens this morning.
    I have no idea what this is.
    In S. Jersey we see black snakes and garter (sp?) snakes.

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    He is a juvenile black snake. When he is about 2 feet long, he will turn black.
     

  3. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    Initial impressions were that it might be an Eastern Milksnake but based on body shape, I agree with Iddee.

    Here in NE/N Central Ohio the Black Rat snake hatchlings are more muddled in color with nowhere near as much contrast.
    New Jersey is well known for having very attractive Black Rat snakes with some individuals showing bright white highlights (faint juvie patterns) all the way into adulthood. You have very pretty hatchlings in your area, I'd love to see pics of some adults.

    EDIT: I just remembered that you had posted this earlier this year!!!

    http://www.beekeepingforums.com/threads/7285-Egg-stealers!!!
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well obviously he ain't a dead snake and also quite obviously I was not there.
     
  5. JPthebeeman

    JPthebeeman New Member

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    That sucker is just plain beautiful! I would have to wrestle him away from Tecumseh and keep him as a pet. :grin:


    ...JP
     
  6. Lpol

    Lpol New Member

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    Obviously its a dangerous snake..which kill the man in any time.
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    In my area, if the snake has round eyes he lives,squinty eyes he dies. Jack
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    In my yard, I typically don't get close enough to look a snake in the eyes!
     
  9. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    Our society's policy of randomly killing everything we see that makes us uncomfortable is not working out very well for our planet. A prime example is the many people who ignorantly spray and kill honeybee swarms rather than try to understand why the bees are there and what benefits they bring to our world.
    It's never a bad thing to try to find out a little about various species and the vital roles they play in our environment. Knowledge doesn't hurt us any.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    :goodpost:

    THANK YOU, Omie
     
  11. HisPalette

    HisPalette New Member

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    Round pupils (good non venomous snake) that keeps away the copperhead and rattlers (cat eye venomous snakes) - we don't kill either...just chase the venomous ones away...
    The pattern and round eye I thought at first was a corn/king snake, but after seeing Iddee's post, I now know why the colorful little guy that lives in our basement, was once patterned and is now black and (bigger! almost 6 feet now) now...going on 5 years. We collect the skin each year in the rafters... We have him/her as a natural mouse trap :grin:
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    If they are just mousing, they live. If they are eating my fish or my eggs or my chickens, well they usually die. The little rough earth snakes that live on crickets always live.

    I sell fish, they feed me, same for the chickens. Unfortunately most of the snakes I end up with are diamond back water snakes. But that sure beats rattlers and moccasins and copperheads.
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    There has never been a poison snake seen or killed on my farm (60 ac.) in over a hundred years that we ever heard of. Our hunting and fishing cabin is a different story (close to the Big Sac river, in St. Clair, Co.) lots of copperheads, some cotten mouths, timber rattlers,and pygmy rattlers. My grandchildern love it up there and run and play in the yard, they know to look for them, but snakes can hide where you least expect, and i know people who have been bit and were deathly sick and heard tell of some oldtimers that died from it years ago.My brothers and i,mow, weedeat, and look things over before any little ones go out to play and an adult is always watching them.The snakes mentioned above are not welcome and will be killed on sight around the cabin, and any other animal that are a threat to the childern or women will be dealt with. Black snakes, king snakes and other round eyed snakes are left alone. Jack
     
  14. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    The snakes here have been observed eating "my" garden toads. It makes me sad, but that's the way of things.

    I did have a laugh at one snake who, with large bulge of toad in its belly, could not exit the garden through the chicken wire as he had entered.
     
  15. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, i remember reading how they catch pythons in Africa.(for zoos i guess) They make a log pen with gaps between them for a python can get in and put a pig in the pen for bait. After the python swallows the pig, it is trapped.Like what you saw, maybe they should start doing this in the swamps of Florida, to catch the big snakes we are hearing about. Jack
     
  16. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I can spare a bee for a pretty spider, but not a hive for a skunk.

    I can spare a toad for a snake, but not a pond full of fish. (I sell fish, no one wants the darned snake.)
     
  17. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Be careful Gypsi, your talking about iddees supper.:lol: Jack
     
  18. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    There are thousands of snakes sold in Texas every year. Some for very high amounts. You just haven't found the market.

    Nah, Jack, I don't eat the water snakes. Just the rattlers.