So I'm wondering, what would happen...

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Versipelis, Apr 29, 2015.

  1. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    If I did away with the queen excluder, and allowed the queen full access to the all the supers, what could I expect to happen? And why is this a problem?
     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Not much difference if all the comb is drawn. If not the bees will draw comb in the supers better without the excluder. You might get a little drone brood in the supers, but once they've hatched the bees will fill it with honey.
     

  3. jwsbees

    jwsbees New Member

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    I recently decided not to use an excluder. I understand that the queen won't cross a capped band of honey of about 2 inches. I use three mediums for brood which is a smidge taller than 2 deeps.
     
  4. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    This may be a 'generally true' rule, but in my experience the queen will lay wherever she pleases. I've had queens cross entire supers of capped honey.
     
  5. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    I agree but it is generally to lay drone brood if there's no place for her to lay it in the brood chambers. That's why I put one foundationless frame in one of the deeps. I cut the drone brood out regularly to keep mites in check.
     
  6. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    I appreciate all your replies. I was thinking more along the lines of having an unchecked "workforce" of bees and what are the associated problems with it? I can't help but think that a large workforce of bees would be a positive thing (more foragers = more honey etc.) . The only negative possibility I can think of is the lack of enough "queen substance" and thus, they would be more prone to swarm.
     
  7. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    There is much more to swarming than "queen substance". room for her to lay, time of year, etc.
     
  8. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    Many folks don't use excluders. IMO, if there is brood or excess pollen on the frame, it isn't mine to take, anyway.
     
  9. jwsbees

    jwsbees New Member

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    Camero7, what do you consider regularly?
     
  10. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Once every 3 weeks
     
  11. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    I guess I need to experiment.
     
  12. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

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    No need to experiment too much. Camero7 is following and interrupting the known drone cycle (24 days).