Social Context and Reproductive Potential Affect Worker Reproductive Decisions in bee

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Americasbeekeeper, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Social Context and Reproductive Potential Affect Worker Reproductive Decisions in a Eusocial Insect
    Eighty-four percent of the fertile bees introduced into a foreign nest (n = 6 colonies) had developed ovaries seven days later, whereas only 55.6% (n = 6 colonies, p = 0.037) did when reintroduced into their native nest. Social context therefore appears to dramatically influence fertile workers reproductive decisions, resulting in a fine tuning of their ovarian activity pattern to their fitness interests. As foreign workers' fertility was not affected by the presence of a queen in the host colony, fertility differences in bees introduced into their mother compared to a foreign nest are likely due to differences in queen signal influence, suggesting that foreign workers do not respond to the host queen signal.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0052217
    Social Context and Reproductive Potential Affect Worker Reproductive Decisions in a Eusocial Insect
    Eighty-four percent of the fertile bees introduced into a foreign nest (n = 6 colonies) had developed ovaries seven days later, whereas only 55.6% (n = 6 colonies, p = 0.037) did when reintroduced into their native nest. Social context therefore appears to dramatically influence fertile workers reproductive decisions, resulting in a fine tuning of their ovarian activity pattern to their fitness interests. As foreign workers' fertility was not affected by the presence of a queen in the host colony, fertility differences in bees introduced into their mother compared to a foreign nest are likely due to differences in queen signal influence, suggesting that foreign workers do not respond to the host queen signal.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0052217
     
  2. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Studies used Bombus terrestris bees.
     

  3. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Read a little furhter to see -- "This possibly widespread reproductive strategy [3] has currently been described in several species ranging from honey bees [4][9], sweat bees [10], [11], stingless bees [12] and bumble bees [13][15], to vespine wasps [16] (Table 1)."
     
  4. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    When I read the title, I jumped from 'A' to 'C' and ASSumed it was all about Apis Mellifera....I admit reading only the abstract and the Introduction. Made me think of the Cape Bee in South Africa that, when queenless, can lay an egg that becomes a queen -I think I read 'fertilized' egg, but that sounds really out there. I read (somewhere) that 1% of Apis Mellifera can do that, (thelytoky), its some kind of hold over from the day when honey bees were like solitary bees in that regard......Did I understand that correctly? :)