Solid Bottom Boards

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Eddy Honey, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I have been given 9-10 brand new unassembled hive setups. They have SBB's. I notice they are reversible. One side of the board allows more room under the frames for the bees. I'm assuming it's a seasonal type of setup? Which side goes up?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    shallow entrance.......
     

  3. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I would have thought the opposite...glad I asked.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Are you sure Iddee? I always use the 3/4" side up no matter what time of year. 3/4" entrance reducers work better this way. :wink:
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Mice will love you, Perry.

    When have you seen a tree hive with that large an entrance?
    With a 3/8 entrance, I don't use a reducer in normal times.
     
  6. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    You know, all of these 9-10 hives came with entrance reducers. I never considered that the reducer won't fit the shallow entrance....but if reversed in the winter it will.
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    There you have it Eddy, ask two fellas the same question and ........................ watch out! :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Which is easier to remove, a reducer setting against the front of the box, or one slid inside and flush?
    Propolis that has been on over winter is NOT easy to break loose.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Do you flip yours over depending on the season Iddee? Seems 3/4" up would be better for summer ventilation too.
    Truthfully I have never seen anyone use the 3/8" side up. (maybe it's a "Tundra" thing). :lol:
     
  10. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I could see both views. Wide side up for winter debris to collect or wide side in the summer for ventilation.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I make my bottom boards with 3/8 in. entrance only. If you do the math, it is equal on a 10 frame hive to about a 3 to 3 1/2 in. Diameter circle, as most tree hives are.

    PS. I think the ventilation fad going around the internet is the most damaging fad around other than removing queen cells.
     
  12. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    ^^True dat! That cut-out I did of that massive hive had a itty bitty crack in the barn board and it was at the center of the hive. No ventilation at the bottom or top. I still have to go back and remove a 5' high x 20" wide comb that all the bees are going into. I got the queen apparently there is something else in there.
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    iddee writes:
    I think the ventilation fad going around the internet is the most damaging fad around other than removing queen cells.

    tecumseh:
    another year, another fad. oh my... and then iddee and tecumseh just fall back on their 'old school' ways of beekeeping.

    most of my bottom boards are solid and by design have a 5/8 inch opening. this works quite nice with my jeffery todd entrance reducer (not only home made. but scap... actually old top bars). like lots of issues (and many unrelated to beekeeping) any decision directly suggest you give up something to gain something.... the real world just never turns up something that is all positives and no negatives... you get something, but invariable you give something up also.

    if you ever see the bottom board entrance on lots of migratory beekeeper's hives you may come to think that any conversation in regards to size of the bottom entry is a large to do over nothing.
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Now you have peaked my curiousity and have my undivided attention! :think:
    Could we perhaps start a thread based on this topic, discussing ventilation and the different aspects of it? Upper ventillation in winter/summer, what log hives do, etc?
    I have always pondered on how bees when left to their own devices somehow manage to survive without all our assistance.:lol:
     
  15. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Ed, I'd like to know how you managed to get a hold of all the free equipment! =) Sign me up for that deal! =)
     
  16. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I did a cut-out for a woman who owns an old dairy farm. Years ago her father wanted to add beekeeping to the family farm so he bought 24+ hive bodies and all the top and bottom components. He stored them in the barn but never got into beekeeping. The women wanted to repay me for removing the bees but when I refused she remembered the unassembled equipment in the barn and insisted that I take it with me. There was even an observation hive. There is tons of foundation but no frames. This seems like old school stuff as the tops are a 2" frame, a pice of masonite, and a galvanized pan to cover it all. I'm sure the bees won't care though lol. I'm betting if I look hard enough I'll find more stuff like the smoker.
     
  17. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    Revisiting this thread 3-1/2 months later. I've been using 3 of the solid bottom boards with 3/8's side up. Compared to my screened bottom board hives, the bees in these hives seem more content to focus the brood nest in the bottom deep and move up only if needed. With the screened bottoms it seems the bees would rather move up away from the screen. Could be a coincidence but.....it is what it is...
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Interesting observation Eddy. :grin:
     
  19. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    interesting observation...

    this observation could also due to other factors but... the bottom most edge of the frames in the lowest box are often not laid up with brood because of the queens tendency to avoid direct light. you can see this clearly in solid bottom boards that have reduced entrances and I would not be surprised if this small difference was even more noticeable with screened bottom boards.
     
  20. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I'll pop in on the floor topic---I flip them: shallow entrance in the winter, deeper in the summer.