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It was my understanding that bottom boards made like that (same ones I use) are supposed to act as a reducer; 3/4 being fully open and 3/8 being reduced) I have been making it a practice to use the 3/8 side because as mentioned the mice are terrible... maybe not in the summer... but wait untill it starts snowing they will make an absolute mess of a hive and comb.
 

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tech hit the nail on the head about the brood nest being farther away from the sunlight. You might even notice the do not fill out the very front bottom corner with cells. Several years ago the slatted rack was the new thing to have to help keep the sunlight out of the hives.

I will admit I RUN THE 3/4" side of bottom boards year around. If entrance reducers are used they are not pushed in flush with the front. Actually most times it is just a stick big enough to cover the amount of entrance I want.
 

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Ventllation is very important---but there are assorted ways of ventilating a hive. In still air, the bees will stream a breeze through the hive by flapping their wings. We try to help them by making the openings available to them adequately large--matching the openings of the hive (one or more) to the size of its population and the season. Too much of an opening or too many of them may not be to the bees' advantage (they also have to maintain their heat). At different times of the day, in different seasons or in changing weather, their needs will vary so what we do is try to provide the best conditions for them to handle these changes as best as possible.
The full answer to this question is really much longer and has to balance many complex factors including additional considerations such as wind direction, light, pests,......
 

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I was taught (long long ago) to use manufactured bottom boards just as cheezer describes. so part of the spring and fall manipulation at that time was flipping over the bottom board.

I think efmesch handled the ventilation question quite well. it is perhaps useful here to point out that bees in their natural state (ie in the hollow of a tree) typically have one entrance the size of a silver dollar at the very bottom of the nest. on occasion bees in such circumstance will have two entrances but these are rare. as far as I can know 'the bees' existing with this one puny entrance for millions of years even without beekeepers to make the opening larger or smaller based upon some whim.
 
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