Some success with the beehives!

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hlhart2001, Aug 28, 2013.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    I just wanted to share 2 small victories...the first is that our languishing Queenless has gone Queenright..not sure how long this will be but, I am enjoying it while it lasts;)) The first pic shows one frame of 3-4 filled with brood in the first deep box and the second is one of 2 in the 2nd deep box. The Queen is laying beautifully and I hope she continues. The last pic is one frame of pristine snow capped honey(as I call it) from our swarm hive(we found them in June)..this frame is in a 3rd -10 frame medium and all but 3 frames are filled...I did put a 4th box and they filled 2 middle frames..should I put them down in the 3rd box replacing the empties on the ends? Our 8 frame 3 deep foundationless experimental hive has a lot of honey..took some and gave it to the now Queenright hive as they need some more stores for the winter...and they'll have lots of babies soon. Although they are still bringing in nectar and pollen. Also we have cold winters here and am wondering about how many 10 frame mediums it may take to get our swarm hive thru...3 or 4 or more? Just wondering if anyone out there has numbers to compare? Thanks, Halley IMG_2689.jpg IMG_2688.jpg IMG_2690.jpg
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    looking good:thumbsup:
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I run double deeps so not sure about mediums. I would think that if you were talking about stores only, 3 would be plenty.
    Nice pics, I especially like that new honey. :thumbsup:
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Bees winter very well in the Okanagan. The weather many years is to warm during Sept, Oct, and the 1St half of Nov. The bees Can be overly active, but with little flows of pollen and nectar the bees are aging themselves quicker and shortening their lives. All those baby bees are what will make up your winter bees and cluster the later into the fall that the hive raises brood the longer the bees from that brood will survive later into the spring. The bees if they are inactive can survive the winter clustering on 40 to 50 lbs. but you need to be ready to give then feed in the spring if the weather is wet, cold and the bees aren't getting flights in or the bloom is delayed. If the weather is warm in the fall, feeding at this time will allow the bees to use the syrup and not consume a large % of the honey stores before winter. It will also stinulate later brood rearing. The later into the fall the bees emerge will result in the more bees living further into the spring.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    those pictures are very nice and tight patterns.

    as to your question on how many mediums.... since I am a long way from Washington State anything I might suggest would be purely speculative.... but I would guess a minimum of 3 and four would be better <I am guessing here that you cannot or do not feed in the winter.
     
  6. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    I agree with Tecumseh that the pictures are just beautiful. The frame of honey is just exquisite. It looks perfect to my novice eye. I am new to beekeeping and have only visited Washington State on vacations; therefore, I would not hazard a guess to how many mediums you need for wintering. Thanks for the great pictures.
     
  7. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Thanks, Everyone, The babies to be born are now in two 10 frame deeps which they'll probably stay in...don't think they'll have time to fill a super...but if they look crowded I will and then take off. I really want them to fill those two deeps. I took a deep frame from another hive and gave it to them...they were also given a deep frame of pollen that I had from last year. They have started filling the other deep frames around the brood but, have some catching up to do..hence my giving them extra honey/pollen. We'll see what happens. The gorgeous honey shot is from a hive that is made up of 10 frame mediums(3 filled and a fourth on top with a couple frames started). If they are able to fill that 4th super I may just keep it on there but, if not I will give the filled frames from the 4th and put in on the ends of the 3rd(which still has a few frames to be completed). The winters are cold/snow, do get below zero in late Dec/Jan and snow goes away mid March...These are Italian/Carnolian cross..the swarm we hived appears to be a combo as well. My beementor who gave me the 5 frames to help the languishing hive says the bees are "mutts" and have survived the cold Methow winters. We'll see how it goes. Halley
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I would suggest you feed or continue to feed and it might also be a good idea to practice a bit of robin hood beekeeping... which is to say to rob from the rich and give to the poor by every other week or so adding a frame of sealed brood to the smaller colonies. not sure if other would agree but in colder climates it seems some minimum critical population is needed to maintain a good sized winter time cluster. you of course don't want to rob the rich so much as to jeopardize their survival... which for me also means do this in small steps and feed both giver and taker just a bit to keep both growing.