Something new?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by PerryBee, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    From Hivelights magazine, CHC

    "For those interested, larvae of an as-of-yet unidentified insect were found on some honey bees in a hive in Manitoba.
    At this point it's suspected they are a beetle larvae, perhaps of the family Meloidae, which includes blister beetles. Larvae are being sent out for id. A cluster of the larvae was between the thorax and abdomen of some live bees in the brood area of the hive. It's estimated less than 1% of the bees had these on them. The honey bee colony was in 3 standard boxes but appeared to be struggling from varroa which was seen on some bees. The larvae were only found on live bees on frames. On the way home from the site, a couple bees I collected with these larvae on them were twitching and seemed otherwise paralysed. Other bees with the larvae on them seemed ok."

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  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Don't tell me we're in for another new bee pest. :dash1:
    What we have already is more than enough.
     

  3. Omie

    Omie Active Member

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    It seems to me that creatures in a weakened state from combinations of a number of stresses (including environmental, chemical, and pollution stresses) will be naturally more vulnerable and likely to succumb to an ever increasing variety of pests, diseases and parasites. The more the pests and diseases multiply, the more we bombard them with pesticides and medications, and the weaker the host becomes from absorbing additional toxins and chemicals...a vicious cycle.