Something Special

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Iddee, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    As many of you know, I had a friend named Wayne that had bees from the 60s and 70s that were never treated in any way when the mites arrived. Only one hive survived, but it multiplied. He gave me a swarm from them, which I have never treated, in 2001. It is still alive and well.

    One of our members, she can identify herself if she wants, came by a couple of weeks ago and picked up a frame of eggs and larva from these bees, to graft from. Here is a pic of the first one emerged. She is going to raise them as Wayne's bees and distribute them as such.


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    [attachment=0:2q66dkbm]waynesqueen.jpg[/attachment:2q66dkbm]
     

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  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Iddee... just as a side bar for mr t's data bank how many hives do you think your buddy Wayne ran without chemical application. I know (via tid bits of info here and there) that we cannot ask Wayne directly so the information is casual and it posed as one of those 'seems like to me' kind of responses.

    ps... years ago one of the life time commecial beekeepers I traveled with talked about his experiences when foul brood ran rampant thru apiaries like some wildfire. at that time one survivor in 40 was what you might expect. I concluded somewhat afterwards that at the point where only one remains a bit of non man induced inbreeding (a technique often used in the old days by queen breeders to reinforce traits) was likely taking place.

    good luck with those queens and when the lady doing the queen rearing gets to the the point she has queens to sell and ship I certainly would like to give them a try.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Tec, He was up to 5 when I was given the swarm in 2001. We didn't keep count, but I would guess we developed and distributed around 100 in the next 8 years. While we never actually raised queens by any conventional methods, we did ust those hives for trapouts, splits, pulling nucs, ETC.
    Of the ones we let go, the feedback was always good. We've never had a report of a hive loss from mites. All was casual observance, tho, with no actual studies being done. That's why I am now trying to get the strain out to people who might keep records on them.
     
  4. Yuleluder

    Yuleluder New Member

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    I also would be interested in these bees when they become available.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Im waiting in line myself for a few of them I havent bought a queen in years but want some of these genetics to add to my lines