Sour smell

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by BeeSpit, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. BeeSpit

    BeeSpit New Member

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    My hubby and I are only into our 2nd year of having bees, so we're pretty green.

    He said he noticed a "sour smell" occasionally, but not constant. We have 2 hives but he can't pinpoint which one it is. might not even be one of the hives but rather something in the woods behind the hives. any suggestions? :confused:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Possibly Goldenrod honey being made.
     

  3. BeeSpit

    BeeSpit New Member

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    Good point. Goldenrod is VERY prevelant right now in this part of AR. thanks!
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Welcome to the forum.
     
  5. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Goldenrod and aster (small white dime sized flowers) are big producers that you should be very greatfull. It is one of the best smells to have as your bees pack away the nectar getting ready for winter.

    Of course now, you have the pleasure of making a real good story up about that mysterious smell coming from the woods for your hubby. :Dancing: I see a video camera, a moonless night, a weak flashlight,...... :yahoo:
     
  6. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    As one who loves to identify flowers, I can tell you that there are so many variations of "aster" that my efforts at ID are generally in vain. The small white daisy-like (but with finer petals) are definately prevalent, but the different varieties vary in flower size and leaf configuration. There are also beautiful deep purple New England asters and ironweed in this area. And that's just the wild ones. Domestic varieties come in all sorts of colors.

    I love flowers!