space for feeding

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by d.magnitude, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    I believe I've come across this information before, but am having trouble finding it now, so I thought I'd ask this knowledgable group.

    How many deep frames does it take to store a gallon of syrup, in this case 2:1 for fall feeding? I know I need to feed my hives a bit this fall (starting now), but I don't want to give too little, or too much. If I had to guess, I'd say my hives have around a total of 4 frames' space in the upper brood chamber of each hive, and I just want to have an idea of how much syrup-making I'm getting into.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A deep frame will normally yield a bit less than a half gallon of honey.
    Honey is 18% water.
    2:1 is 33% water.
    It would take approx. a gallon of 2:1 per deep frame,after they condense it, plus what they eat.
     

  3. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Thanks, that's just what I was looking for.

    Here's a related queston: When do you evaluate how much reserves your hives have going into winter. I looked at mine a few weeks ago, and the top deeps were packed with honey. I thought they were in great shape for winter, and I might not feed at all. Now they seem to have consumed 1/3 or so of that honey,and I guess I'm bound for some feeding. When should I take a "last reading" and call it quits? Around first frost? At any rate, I think I will place some "emergency feed" on top of the brood chambers over winter.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I can't help there. In NC, we never go 30 days without having weather where we can check them. I do the "lift back of hive" check until they feel light. Then I go in and check. Feb. 15 on until flower bloom is the critical time. That is when the new brood will consume most stores.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    with 2 to 1 I suspect you should be able to feed past first frost. ideally up till the point where temperature make the syrup too cold to pick up by the bees.
     
  6. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    update:
    I decided to remove a frame of honey from each of my two strong hives to make room for 2 gal. of Fumagilin-treated 2:1 syrup, which I gave them last Thursday. I had "guestimated" earlier that each upper hive body was about 2/3 full of honey. I guess at some point I miscalculated, since when I returned yesterday they had only taken 3/4 gal. each of syrup (the full dose for Fum.B is 2 gal.) and the upper hive bodies looked PACKED with honey again. What to do? I don't want to waste the syrup I made up (or the medication). I see my options as follows:

    1) Toss the extra syrup, or maybe stash it in the fridge to use later if they need it. I was on the fence about medicating for Nosema anyway, but my bee club scared me into it.
    2) Remove a capped frame and replace it w/ and empty one, so they have room to move the medicated syrup down. This seems like bad idea as I'd just be taking the med. honey away, for them to replace it with the same, and I wouldn't want to eat the stuff.
    3) Just leave the feeders in place for now. I like this path of least resistance, and maybe the bees will need the feed a little later and will just take it down when they need it. But I don't want to run the risk of them becoming honeybound, and I don't want problems to arise in the extra space in the super covering my inverted-jar feeder.

    Opinions?
    At least I'm happy to see that they appear to be well-stocked. I'm not even seeing much goldenrod around anymore- I guess this is the beginning of the end of the year (or the beginning of the beginning :D ).
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Leave it. Honeybound is not a problem in Oct. in PA.
     
  8. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Sounds too easy, but I like it.
    Of course if it doesn't move in a month, I'll take it (and the empty super around it) off to get properly set up for the winter.

    Thanks, Dan
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a d.magnitude snip..
    the full dose for Fum.B is 2 gal.

    tecumseh:
    the quantity depends on if you are feeding in the fall or in the spring time. I seem to remember??? that 1 gal is the appropriate quantity for fall feeding of fumidil.

    a d.magnitude snip..
    3) Just leave the feeders in place for now.

    tecumseh:
    if the syrup (and most importantly fumidil) is protected from the sunlight this is the option I would chose. as the hive consumes some feed in the hive they should move the syrup in the feeder down.
     
  10. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    I'm a notorious instruction reader. The spec sheet that comes with Fumagilin-B recommends 2 gal. for each 2-chamber colony in the fall, and 1 gal. for each 2-chamber colony in the spring. That's with about 5 gallons of 2:1 syrup mixed with a 24g bottle of Fumagilin-B. Not trying to correct you, Tec, so much as have the info posted here for anyone else who may decide to treat, but who's forte may not be following the written instructions.

    My syrup, and fumidil, is protected from the sun inside an empty super on top of the inner cover above the hive. Another detail I didn't mention: One hive has begun to build some "wild comb" in and around the hole in the inner cover. I just scraped it off, but should I be very concerned that it's a sign that they need more room with this new feed trickling in?

    -Dan