splitting

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Buzzen, May 9, 2012.

  1. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    I'm going into year two and have a strong hive I would like to split. I would like to make a nuc, but didn't know if the old queen goes in the nuc or stays in the original hive? Does it matter? There are queen cells started, I was going to put the frame with the cells in the nuc because I have a hard time finding this queen. I have only seen her once in the first year.
     
  2. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Making nuc with old queen and few frames of brood and food will almost certainly eliminate urge to swarm.
    If you make a nuc with a queen cell, the original hive may still swarm.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Marbees is bang on. :thumbsup:
    Once a hive has started swarm preparation there is little you can do to stop it. Better to grab the queen and a few frames of brood, create a nuc, and fool the remaining bees left with the cells into thinking it's swarmed.
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    buzzen, i leave the queen in the original hive, take the frame with the cells and place it in the nuc, along with 1 or 2 other frames of brood in various stages of development, (with the bees intact on the frames) add a frame of honey/pollen and an empty drawn frame. shake additional nurse bees, and enough bees into the nuc to cover the brood and then some. give your original hive foundation to replace the frames removed. also, give them space, supers with foundation, if she is really busting.

    the reason i leave the queen in the original hive is mainly because of a new queen's development in a hive(time it takes) i would expect to produce a very good honey crop from.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If I made a nuc with the cells, I would leave it in the original location and move the old hive with the queen.

    The queen needs to move, to make them feel the change.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what iddee said.... + in moving the old queen any bee in the box tend to stay settle into that box with that queen. in a queenless hive (that is moved) the bees can abandon the box... if a queenless hives remains in the original location the worker bees will not abandon their existing location.

    ps... moving nucs or hives with cells can also be a somewhat risky venture. beyond a certain age the cells are rather robust but prior to the time when the hard shell of the new queen begins to form (turns from white to leathery) a queen cell is extremely fragile.
     
  7. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    If the queen cells are capped, is it inevitable they will swarm? Or probably already have? I haven't been able to get into the hives this week to check. Outside everything looks normal, same amount of traffic in and out. I don't want to lose this queen, she is an egg laying machine.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey Buzzen, I just noticed that in your first post you mentioned queen cells. Are they swarm cells or could they be supercedure cells or even emergency cells? I guess I should have asked that first. If there are numerous cells and they are located (hanging almost) along the bottom of the frames they are swarm cells. If they are already capped the old queen may or may not still be there but if she still is, she won't be for long. If the cells are somewhere in the middle of the frame and are only numbering 2 or 3, they could be supercedure cells.
     
  9. Buzzen

    Buzzen Member

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    Last check which was a 7 or 8 days ago there were four cells started on the bottom of the frame. I assumed swarm cells. There was no larvae in them at the time. I am going to try and get this split done in the next day or two unless they swarm before then. I hope they don't. I should probably have had it done but with the weather and work I can't get a break. Thanks for the opinions everyone, it seems either way would work.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip..
    There was no larvae in them at the time.

    tecumseh..
    dry cups these are generally always present in a hive and mean nothing.
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Ahhhhhh. there we have the information. A lot of hives have queen cups along the bottoms of frames, they often don't amount to anything but as soon as you spot an egg or larvae in them, get ready.
    It sounds like you may actually have a bit of time in your favour, I was thinking that you already had capped or almost capped queen cells.