Spring Bees

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I having worries about this year. With winter not even close to being done I'm worried I might lose 1 or both of my hives. I've been calling around to see who haves nucs/bees for this year. All are sold out and 1 I did get 2 nucs on their list. They said it depends on how many they get. No money up front. Will pay when they have bees for me. So, chance I might be out of luck. Should I find another place and buy just for a back up? The place I ordered from last year I wasn't too happy with their bees. Maybe because I was green I didn't know what I was looking at and what I was doing. They want payment when you call in. That will put me on the list to actually get bees. I want to expand but was hoping to pick up some swarms. But, that is a gamble as well. Need advice
     
  2. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    As you already know the whole beekeeping thing is a gamble. Order your bees where you can, have a feeling that demand for bees this spring will be greater than usual. On Sunday heard some disturbing news from Quebec, guy already had loss ~ 60%. Friend who sells nucs from around here already has orders for 300+ nucs. Very soon he will stop taking orders. I just placed order for 30 queens from California coming by the end of April. Cross my fingers.
     

  3. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    I've gotten in the habit of ordering a couple packages every winter just because I can't predict the future: I don't know what my winter losses will end up being; I don't know what swarm season will be like; I don't know if my schedule will allow me enough "bee time" to make splits, etc. The thing about ordering packages/nucs, if it turns out you don't need them, you can turn around and re-sell them in a hot second to someone who didn't order in time.

    Not sure who you've checked with for bees, but Apple Blossom Honey Farm (Doug Hoffman) in Star City may be closest to you. There's also Danny Slabaugh in Nappannee, Graham's in Morgantown, Clover Blossom (Dave Shenefield) in La Fontaine, Majenica Creek (DeVon Howald) in Huntington, Hunter's Honey Farm in Martinsville, and David Burns at Long Lane over in west-central Illinois.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I like the way indy thinks. of course if you are into the business of producing nucs you never know when you establish price or you take order how you bees might look 90 days down the road. some folks do use the money folks send in the form of downpayment to feed bees which definitely assist in how many hives you have to split when the time comes.
     
  5. oblib

    oblib New Member

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    I'm not sure if David Burns will have nucs or not again this year. It seems like he is shaking all his bees into packages and not selling nucs. He sold none last year and still doesn't have any advertised for this year. Thats one of the reasons I decided to sell some overwintered nucs because I didn't see any available in my area.
     
  6. Pilotbeekeeper

    Pilotbeekeeper New Member

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    Is there a Bee Club in your area. if so, Join it and attend regularly. I've only been a member of mine for 8 months and have made several contacts that would help out in a situation like this.

    PBK
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    I ordered two packages with the same thoughts in mind as Indy. I have two trap outs in the spring, 2-3 splits and Lord knows how many swarms.

    But, if you are willing to travel south, Graham's Beeworks in Morgantown, Indiana is taking orders for packages. $95 before taxes. They were nice enough to call me (on a call list) last weekend to let me know. I ordered 2. They expect April 13th for pickup. I was told they would run out by the end of January for this first batch.
     
  8. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I also ordered a Nuc (back in november) just in case. If I don't need it I'm sure there will be no troubles re-selling, or letting the producer sell my reserved nuc to somebody who needs it more. Personally, I would be reluctant to put money down just to be on a wait list. What if the producer suffers 50% winter loss and can't fill the order. From my understanding of how these things work you pay at the time of delivery, but this could vary by region.

    Now that you have a bunch of drawn comb, starting over with small nucs or packages should be easier.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Pete When your hive survives the winter and your getting your nuc get an extra queen to split your last year hive. Good swarm control puling an nuc out of the over wintered colony.
     
  10. Ray

    Ray Member

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    I just ordered a 3lb package (just in case, just like Indy), same price as last year. I get mine from a local Amish (middleman), who also makes woodenware. The (woodenware) prices are great and the shipping is almost zero.:thumbsup:
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    I having worries about this year.

    tecumseh..
    don't do that.... only Jack and Iddee and myself are old enough to worry :wink:.
     
  12. Markwell

    Markwell New Member

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    What do you mean by this?
     
  13. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    In the final analysis, everything is a gamble except for death and taxes.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Crazy8, Why are you so pessimistic? :crybye: Is there some special reason that makes you fear for the ability of your hives to survive the winter?:confused:
    What's the matter with all the rest of you posters, jumping on this pessimistic way of thinking? There's nothing wrong with saying you don''t know if and where you''ll be able to get package bees, that's realism, but expecting 100% die-out with no reason to back you---that's just not the right attitude. Chin up, smile, your hives are going to pull through gloriously and your going to have a terriffic season. :amen:
     
  15. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Efmesch, you make me ashamed of my "death and taxes" remark. That was a sidebar comment. Actually, I am a half glass full guy. I have three mature hives and three nucs that I hope are wintering well. I hope to see them Saturday for the first time in some three months. My knee surgery followed by cold weather has not allowed me to stay on top of my two apiaries. If some of my bees die, I will order more or make splits. I want a good honey harvest off of my mature hives, and as such, do not want to split more than one of those hives. I can't wait to see what this year brings.
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I had no intention to shame anyone (Notice, I DIDN'T say "Shame on you "), just wanted to get that positive attitude, becoming of beekeepers, back on track.
    Lazy shooter, It will be my pleasure to share your half full glass with you---and find that as we drink from it, instead of emptying out, it gets fuller. :grin:
     
  17. Markwell

    Markwell New Member

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    Well, exactly. Why is beekeeping any different?
     
  18. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Markwell:

    There is no difference. We cannot cheat death, and ever since man arrived there have been taxes in some form. The cavemen didn't levy taxes, but the ring leader took from the lessors. Beekeepers will be taxed and they will die. But during the process a beekeeper can have a huge fun time. I am going to see my bees tomorrow. I can't express how much that means to me.

    Efmesch:

    I truly wish we could physically drink from the same glass. Maybe next year I will make a trip to Israel.

    As a young man, one of my mentors told me "the more you give the more you have." He could tell that the remark confused me so he added, "you have to figure that out for yourself." As the years passed, I did figure out what he meant. He was right.

    After inspecting my two small apiaries on Saturday, I will give a report on my spring bees.
     
  19. Markwell

    Markwell New Member

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    You sir, are a true beekeeper. May i ask in what way you keep your bees (methods, hives etc.)?
     
  20. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Taking risks has always been a part of beekeeping.