Staining VS. Painting

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bitty Bee, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    Is staining wooden ware better or worse than simply painting it? I know that both methods serve the same purpose but, I like the way stained wood looks. (and I thought it might make for some handsome beehives)
    Plus I know of a place where I can get stain cheaper than I can get paint.

    Also, I have never stained anything. Is it any more difficult or time consuming than painting?
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Staining itself will not protect the wood. Its purpose is to soak into the wood to bring out the grain with a little pigment. Unless you varnish it will be unprotected from the elements. Painting in the long run would be cheaper and easier. I go to the hardware stores and buy paint that they mixed wrong. You can get that cheap.
     

  3. wfuavenger

    wfuavenger New Member

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    [​IMG]

    Personally I prefer to stain and seal with Urethane Varnish. I have 5 hives the white color and the 4 at my house are all stained.
     
  4. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Wow, those look really nice. how can you dare to take a hive tool to them? How do your neighbors feel about having them right out where everyone can see them?

    :) Can't you find a nicer something to hold down your cover? :)

    Very nice. When I get my building finished I am going to get some new equipment and stain it. Then I'm going to set up a nice little beeyard and keep it like a garden. You have inspired me. Thanks.
     
  5. wfuavenger

    wfuavenger New Member

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    I was concerned at first, but most of my neighbors love it. They think it is really cool. They will stop and watch me and ask questions at times. The back deack is temporary. this winter they will be moved to just off the back deck. The cinderblock square was in the way on the ground while I was sweeping. It does not sit there normaly.
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Those are sweet looking hives, something to be proud of.
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    those bees livin in better home than I am. Them things look like fine furniture that belongs in the house
     
  8. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Yeah, they were just out on the porch while the floors were being refinished. He's gonna move them back inside after they dry.

    ha,ha,ha.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    this year I have begun to try an 'almost' cold dip stain and sealant (sealing being what riverrat was telling you that varnish would do). I picked up a formula from another beekeeper via a government web site. The 'almost' being that the mix has to be heated somewhat to get the parifin in the mix dissolved.

    the end product looks a bit like wvuavenger hive bodies without the sheen.
     
  10. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    All our hives are stained. There are many types of stain as well as colors. We like the stain because it soaks into the wood and never peels like paint does.
    We buy our stain for the most part from Home Depot for $5.00 a gallon or $15.00 for 5 gallons, of course we take the colors onb the OOPS shelf. It is Berh brand solid color fence and deck stain. Also since it is deck and fence stain it does protect the wood.

    [​IMG]

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    :mrgreen: Al
     
  11. Robo

    Robo New Member

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    The best thing I have found is used motor oil. It is free and holds up better than anything else I've tried.

    [​IMG]

    These supers (on the left) where about 3 years old in this picture. They are now about 4 years and still look the same.

    [​IMG]

    The only draw back is it takes a couple of weeks for them to dry. I know some will think it is bad for the bees, but only the outsides are painted. Richard Taylor used and swore by creosote for his equipment.
     
  12. Watchdog2020

    Watchdog2020 New Member

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    I used a stain and polyurethane because the ‘hives need to look nice if they are in our yard’ – LOL
    (BTW – the boardmans are used for water which helps keep most of the girls out of the neighbors pool)


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    man.... you folks is too pretty a beekeepers for me.

    anyways thanks folks for sharing the pictures of your hives.

    Robo writes:
    The only draw back is it takes a couple of weeks for them to dry. I know some will think it is bad for the bees, but only the outsides are painted.

    tecumseh:
    Jay Smith (pretty much 'the man' in his day as far as queen rearing was concerned) use to heat used motor oil and then dip his bottom boards. he did this to limit ant problem but it likely made the bottom boards last a bit longer also. in those days prior to pallets it was very common for beekeepers to set hives directly on the ground.
     
  14. Bitty Bee

    Bitty Bee New Member

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    Thanks everybody! Sorry I haven't replied sooner, a lightening strike fried several things, including our internet, and we just got the internet fixed.

    I love all the pictures and definitely like the idea of staining more than I did before. Right now I can still get stain cheaper than paint(even mis-tint paint, which is what we buy anyway).However, I wasn't sure that I wanted to use the stain, so I didn't look to see what kind of stain it was.( Porch type or not)
    Also we already have paint that Mom said I have to use before I can buy more. :D So this project has to wait a little while anyway.

    I have read about the motor oil thing before but I was afraid the smell would never leave. Does it? I don't know if I'm patient enough to wait that long for it to dry either. Does it really make the wood last longer?

    Again, thank you everybody!
     
  15. Bryn

    Bryn New Member

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    How about using linseed oil on the hives?

    Bryn