stocking observation hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by charmd2, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok. I bought an observation hive off craigslist and quite honestly did not realize how much of a pain it would be to take off the plexiglass to access the frames.

    Now previously when I bought a package or hived a swarm I simply removed the cover and a few frames and unceremoniously dumped them in. I am thinking that may not be the best approach. Is there a tried and true way short of isolating the queen in a swarm and installing her first?

    Really I am thinking establishing a nuc and then moving frames of bees and brood as one might be less traumatic to me.

    So experts how do you recommend that installation?
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Charla writes:
    Really I am thinking establishing a nuc and then moving frames of bees and brood as one might be less traumatic to me.

    tecumseh:
    I must first say my experience with observation hives is quite limited but your snipped comments would likely be my own preferred option.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would agree, a nuc and then into the observation hive, can't imagine how else to get 'em in there.
    If we finally find a place I hope to install bees in mine as well, 2 years new and never any bees in it. :(
     
  4. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've got a years experience with my OB hive so I definately don't know everything. What I did was remove a queen that was about to swarm along with 3 fully drawn frames with brood and one with pollen and honey from a deep. I let them settle in a nuc at my house for a week. At that point I moved the nuc to where my OB hive is located (3 miles away) and installed them. I installed them on Saturday morning knowing no one would be there until Monday morning so any confusion would be gone by then. It was pretty seamless.

    I've got a 5-deep OB hive. It's larger than normal but being that small (versus a 20 deep frame hive) you'd better keep your eyes on it. It can quickly get congested and could be prone to swarming. As soon as I start seeing few open cells and a lot of capped cells I'll steal a frame or two of capped brood and attendents and give the hive back empty drawn frames. My swarm queen was superceded in late fall and I ended up having to requeen with a brand new queen that I had raised. I'm a little nervous she'll be prone to swarming because she's starting to lay like a mad dog.
     
  5. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am actually ok with swarming in mine. Its eight mediums. I have no problem catching them outside or letting them attempt to become feral. (I live in the middle of nowhere no neighbors closer than 1/2 mile).

    But it sounds like transfering bees and brood is the way to go. I was really trying to get my mind around shaking a swarm into it.
     
  6. DCoates

    DCoates New Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Your location is definitely more conducive for swarms. My OB hive is at a factory where there are 85+ workers.
     
  7. charmd2

    charmd2 New Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would manage that one closely too.