Store frames outside or inside?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Have just reduced a number of hives from 3 deep to 2 deeps and have several boxes of frames with comb, some empty and many chock full of pollen and maybe a few with honey in the top corners.
    Would I be better off just storing them outside in a beetight manner (screened and ventilated) or should I bring them into my heated basement. If the basement, should I leave them open to ventilate or close them tight?
    I am trying to stop the frames with pollen from moulding as they would give a good boost in the spring.
    These were from a deadout this spring.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    (See, ya can be in yer 50's and grey and still have questions :lol: )
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    If you take them inside you need to protect them from humidity, rodents and wax moths. Outside in fresh air and sunshine protect them from rodents.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I will add to Americanbeekeepers list of things to consider outside is you also will need to protect these frames from movement or being jostled around during the colder months since the wax and i suspect the plastic will get very fragile and can shatter much like glass.

    Can't say I do much storing of such stuff here except in a freezer... but in North Dakota we would have stored such stuff in an unheated but closed up out building.

    I take it the white spots are mold?
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hi Tec:

    Yes, the white stuff is mold. I dropped these frames in strong hives this summer and they cleaned up so I couldn't tell which ones they were. Still, I would like to prevent them from getting this way in the first place. If I had a huge freezer I would use it but I have too many boxes to do that. I store all my extracted honey supers in the heated basement with a sheet of newspaper between each box, but they are dry, no honey or pollen in the frames.
     
  5. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Perry:

    You live in Nova Scotia, you do have a huge freezer; It's called outside :rolling:
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :lol: :rotfl:
    Nice Gunny, reminds me of that "tundra" thing Iddee layed on me a while back!
     
  7. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Sorry Perry, Couldn't resist :drinks:
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    As far north as you live I would say outside in the dry. Protect from rodents, not sure but would think wax moths are gone by now in you area.
     
  9. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    I know placing frames in a freezer kills SHB and wax moth larvae, but is it also a good method of long term storage for capped honey which can't be extracted imediately?
     
  10. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    yes
     
  11. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    you have SHB in nova sco........up there (i need a 3rd grade kid to teach me how to spell :/ ) anyways....really...i thought SHB was a warm weather thing....figured we had SHB an you had like psyco polar bear problems or something :|
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    No SHB in Nova Scotia (yet).
    Queens that arrived this spring from Hawaii had SHB larvae on the cages and were quarantined. I believe there may be a small presence in Quebec and Ontario but again, those areas have been quarantined. Not sure about Alberta.
    This (and tracheal mites) are somethings we have been fortunate to not have graced us with their presence.
     
  13. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    could they even live there....i mean they kinda chill out down here in the winter an i dont do any more than put the frames in the fridge to kill the beatles....i dont know much about your weather up there but ummm....brrrrrrrrrrrrrr...it was 85 here today in florida....doesnt your grass grow on ice...lol...seriously tho...isnt it too cold to support the SHB life cycle...if they went into the ground they would surely freeze an die right ???
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It was -7 C this morning and -20 for a few weeks in Jan. Feb . and sometimes March is not uncommon. Not sure if Beetles would adapt or not?
     
  15. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    lol....little furry SHB....what suprises me is how the bees live there....they must act alot diffrent than they do here...when it gets in the 60's during the day i swear i see a little bee leg stick out the entrance to test the water before a bunch of other bees shove it out the door...lol...seriously tho its easy to tell they dont like the colder days...takes em a good while ta get wound up in the morning...if it dropped down to -7 they would stick a white flag out the door an surrender
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They may think it's too cold to go outside when it DROPS to 50, but they will be flying by the hundreds when it RISES to 50.