Storing supers with puled comb in winter

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Yankee11, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Since this will be my first winter to get to store supers with pulled comb. I would like to hear some ways everyone else stores their supers and comb in winter. I don't have a barn to store them in. They will have to be outside. i do have access to wooden pallets and rolls of that clear shrink wrap that warehouses wrap pallets in. I was thinking of putting a piece of plywood on top of a pallet and stacking the supers on the plywood and wrapping them with that shrink wrap. I have read something about para-moth crystals. I think I will have about 30 supers full of foundation to store.
     

  2. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Thanks, Iddee.

    I had sent him a email with no response yet. I just sent him a PM.

    Have you used this stuff and is that I need?
     
  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    YES and YES.

    If he doesn't respond, let me know and I'll call him.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    by the sound of it Yankee you must have had an acceptable year. beyond the wax moth issue suggested by iddee (with which I agree) you also will need to limit the access of mice. this generally requires a good tight bottom and top... generally shrink wrap is only necessary if you are using paradichlorobenzene (or wax moth crystals) to somewhat contain the fumes and not 'certan' or Bt. when you do get in contact with Bruce tell him his skinny little buddy has been missing his presence.
     
  5. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Nothing yet Iddee. So when you have a chance maybe holler at him. Thanks.

    Yes Tech, for our first full year we came out OK I think. Went from 7 to 18 Hives and harvested a little over 60 gallons of honey. Of which we have
    about 9 gallons left. May have gotten an order for 5 of those gallons today. woohoo.

    Sure discovered the value of pulled comb, hence my post to make sure we keep it protected over the winter..
     
  6. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Congrats. Good luck with the storage.
     
  7. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Wax Moth Prevention Storage

    Some bits of info.

    Wax moths prefer drawn/pulled comb that has had brood raised in it.
    PDB ( para-moth ?) is not stocked by UK beekeeping suppliers ---- there is a health issue.
    Wax moth is killed by freezing temperatures. Outside secure storage can take advantage of this.

    A lot of UK beeks store their drawn honey frames 'wet'. After extraction, the 'wet' frames are put back in the supers. Each super then goes in a refuse sack and the sack is sealed. A stack of these supers then goes in a suitable outside location. The 'wet' frames act as a deterrent to the wax moth. I have stored supers overwinter like this for several years. It works for me.
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Sundance is active on the trading post today. Send him another PM, but not email. He seems to have a problem with email.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    freezing is a good method also but here (and in much of the southern US) since the wax moth season in year round you would essentially have to keep boxes of comb in a freezer all winter long.

    ideally I try to remove space with frames that have seen no brood and these I simply stack until I need them next spring time.
     
  10. CarrollwoodBees

    CarrollwoodBees New Member

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    National Pesticide Information Center, "B.t. subsp. aizawai is highly toxic to honey bees while subsp. kurstaki,israelensis, and tenebrionis have minimal toxicity to bees (2)." BTtech.pdf, http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/BTtech.pdf

    Since I use BT to kill hornworms on tomatoes and knew it worked on larva, I suspected that BT would kill my bee larva, so it never occurred to me to use it on the hives to kill wax moth. Seeing BT aizawai promoted so heavily on the bee forums, I had to research it more thoroughly before adding my 2cents. Some sites say it's ok, but none where I trusted the source. Found this one.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The way I read it, only minimal when used properly. On the other hand, I wouldn't call a wax moth invasion minimal.


    "B.t. subsp. aizawai is highly toxic to honey bees while subsp. kurstaki, israelensis, and tenebrionis have minimal toxicity to bees.
    When B.t. pesticides are used according to product labels the risk to bees and other nontarget beneficial insects is minimal."