Struggling Hive-What to Do?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Hog Wild, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    I removed a hive from an old house for a friend back in early June and was pretty confident that I did not get the queen during the removal. I added a queen to the hive and they/she are doing well but I am concerned that as slow as they are progressing if I don't do something now they will not have the # s or the supply to make it through the Winter. I started my first hives this year and have built up four pretty strong ones but this my fifth seems to be struggling.

    I have plenty of brood in my other hives, my question is should I take a frame from each and incorporate them into my struggling hive? If so, do I take the frames from the struggling hive and put them in my active ones or replace them with new?

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I have the same situation. I plan to keep feeding the weak one until Sept. If it doesn't show a great improvement by then, I will combine it with a strong hive, then split it in the spring. It's called taking your losses in the fall. Taking brood and stores from a strong hive now may cause you to lose both hives.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you are not feeding this hive I would put the syrup to them for sure.
     
  4. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Yeah, I have been feeding since day 1. The queen is laying and they seem to be slowly holding their own but I was wandering if I should do anything now that could help them for the upcoming Winter.

    Maybe I will combine and split in the Spring as well, if things don't turn around.

    Thanks
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    your bees sound like they may be hitting the critical mass. The queen will not lay any more eggs than what the hive can handle this heat isnt helping matters either. Make sure the hive is not getting honey bound restricting room for the queen to lay. Adding a frame or 2 of brood would help boost numbers and get the queen firing off more eggs
     
  6. Bee3

    Bee3 New Member

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    I would grab a couple of brood frames from one or two of your healthy boxes and put them in. Maybe you need to extract a frame or two or put in some built out frames for a spot for your queen too lay. Many options.
     
  7. rast

    rast New Member

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    Another factor in growing bee numbers is the quality of the pollen they are bringing in. If it is low in necessary nutrients and minerals, they will be slow in growing. The majority of the pollen around my house is from bahia grass which is really poor, but it's close and easy so they work the heck out of it. I supplemented my nucs with some megabee and they are growing well.